Spectacle definition

spĕktə-kəl
Frequency:
Something like a pair of eyeglasses in shape, use, etc.
noun
25
10
A public show or exhibition on a grand scale.
noun
15
9
The definition of a spectacle is something amazing, interesting or exciting to see that attracts attention.

An example of a spectacle is a great fireworks show.

An example of a spectacle is a person throwing a tantrum who all others in the room are staring at.

noun
6
3
Something that can be seen or viewed, especially something of a remarkable or impressive nature.
noun
6
4
A public performance or display, especially one on a large or lavish scale.
noun
1
2
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A regrettable public display, as of bad behavior.

Drank too much and made a spectacle of himself.

noun
1
2
A pair of eyeglasses.
noun
0
2
Something resembling eyeglasses in shape or suggesting them in function.
noun
0
2
Something exhibited to view; usually, something presented to view as extraordinary, or as unusual and worthy of special notice; a remarkable or noteworthy sight; a show; a pageant.
noun
0
2
An exciting exhibition, performance or event.
noun
0
2
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(usually in the plural) An optical instrument consisting of two lenses set in a light frame, and worn to assist sight, to obviate some defect in the organs of vision, or to shield the eyes from bright light.
noun
0
2
(figuratively) An aid to the intellectual sight.
noun
0
2
Something to look at, esp. some strange or remarkable sight; unusual display.
noun
3
6
An embarrassing situation.

He made a spectacle out of himself.

noun
0
3
The brille of a snake.
noun
0
3
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(old-fashioned) A pair of eyeglasses.
noun
1
5
make a spectacle of oneself
  • to behave foolishly or improperly in public
idiom
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
spectacle
Plural:
spectacles

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of spectacle

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin spectāculum from spectāre to watch frequentative of specere to look at spek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French spectacle, from Latin spectaculum (“a show, spectacle"), from spectare (“to see, behold"), frequentative of specere (“to see"); see species.

    From Wiktionary