Spark meaning

spärk
The definition of a spark is a small burst of fire that comes off of a main fire, a person with a fiery personality, or the small seeds of some intense feeling or emotion.

An example of a spark is a small fiery ball that comes off of a wood burning fire, lands on the floor and goes out.

An example of a spark is a young lively child.

An example of a spark is when you begin to feel a little bit curious about something.

noun
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To serve as the activating or animating influence of or in; stir up; activate.

To spark interest.

verb
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Liveliness; vivacity.
noun
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A short or small burst of electrical discharge.
noun
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An incandescent particle, especially:
  • One thrown off from a burning substance.
  • One resulting from friction.
  • One remaining in an otherwise extinguished fire; an ember.
noun
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A glistening particle, as of metal.
noun
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A trace or suggestion, as:
  • A quality or feeling with latent potential; a seed or germ.
    The spark of genius.
  • A vital, animating, or activating factor.
    The spark of revolution.
noun
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A radio operator aboard a ship.
noun
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An elegantly dressed, highly self-conscious young man.
noun
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A male suitor; a beau.
noun
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To court or woo.
verb
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A ship's radio operator.
noun
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To make or throw off sparks.
verb
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To come forth as or like sparks.
verb
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To produce the sparks properly.
verb
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To trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc).
verb
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noun
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To spark is to emit little electrical currents or signals, or to emit little bursts of fire or light.

An example of spark is when a broken extension cord has little bursts of electricity coming out of the broken wires.

verb
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To give off sparks.
verb
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To operate correctly. Used of the ignition system of an internal-combustion engine.
verb
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To set in motion; activate.

The incident sparked a controversy.

verb
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To rouse to action; spur.

A cheering crowd sparked the runner to triumph.

verb
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To court a woman or women.
verb
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A glowing bit of matter, esp. one thrown off by a fire.
noun
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Any flash or sparkle of light like this.
noun
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A tiny beginning or vestige, as of life, interest, excitement, etc.; particle or trace.
noun
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A dashing, gallant young man.
noun
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A beau or lover.
noun
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To court, woo, pet, etc.
verb
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(born Muriel Sarah Camberg) 1918-2006; Brit. writer.
proper name
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An open source big data framework from the Apache Software Foundation. Spark is used to analyze huge amounts of real-time data in RAM in contrast to Hadoop (another Apache project), which continuously writes to the storage drive. As a result, Spark is generally many times faster. Because Spark does not have its own distributed file system, it is often used in conjunction with the Hadoop Distributed File System. See Hadoop and big data.
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A small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire.
noun
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A small, shining body, or transient light; a sparkle.
noun
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(figuratively) A small amount of something, such as an idea, that has the potential to become something greater, just as a spark can start a fire.
noun
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(in plural sparks but treated as a singular) A ship's radio operator.
noun
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(UK, slang) An electrician.
noun
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(intransitive) To give off a spark or sparks.
verb
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A gallant, a foppish young man.
noun
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To woo, court.
verb
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Origin of spark

  • Middle English sparke from Old English spearca V., from Middle English sparken from Old English spearcian
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin or from spark
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English sparke, sperke, from Old English spearca, from Proto-Germanic *sparkô, *sprakô (cf. Dutch spark and sprank, Middle Low German sparke), from Proto-Indo-European *sp(h)er(e)g- (“to strew, sprinkle") (compare Breton erc'h (“snow"), Latin spargere (“to scatter, spread"), sparsus (“scattered"), Lithuanian sprógti (“to germinate"), Ancient Greek [script?] (spargân, “to swell"), Persian پراکن (parākan, “scatter, spread"), Avestan [script?] (frasparega, “branch, twig"), Sanskrit [script?] (Parjanva, “rain, rain god")).
    From Wiktionary
  • probably Scandinavian, akin to Old Norse sparkr 'sprightly'
    From Wiktionary