Spark definition

spärk
Liveliness; vivacity.
noun
8
3
To serve as the activating or animating influence of or in; stir up; activate.

To spark interest.

verb
6
2
To spark is to emit little electrical currents or signals, or to emit little bursts of fire or light.

An example of spark is when a broken extension cord has little bursts of electricity coming out of the broken wires.

verb
3
1
To rouse to action; spur.

A cheering crowd sparked the runner to triumph.

verb
2
2
A male suitor; a beau.
noun
1
1
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The definition of a spark is a small burst of fire that comes off of a main fire, a person with a fiery personality, or the small seeds of some intense feeling or emotion.

An example of a spark is a small fiery ball that comes off of a wood burning fire, lands on the floor and goes out.

An example of a spark is a young lively child.

An example of a spark is when you begin to feel a little bit curious about something.

noun
1
2
The discharge itself.
noun
1
2
An elegantly dressed, highly self-conscious young man.
noun
1
2
A glistening particle, as of metal.
noun
0
1
A trace or suggestion, as:
  • A quality or feeling with latent potential; a seed or germ.
    The spark of genius.
  • A vital, animating, or activating factor.
    The spark of revolution.
noun
0
1
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(informal) A radio operator aboard a ship.
noun
0
1
A flash of light, especially a flash produced by electric discharge.
noun
0
1
A short pulse or flow of electric current.
noun
0
1
To court or woo.
verb
0
1
A glowing bit of matter, esp. one thrown off by a fire.
noun
0
1
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A very brief flash of light accompanying an electric discharge through air or some other insulating material, as between the electrodes of a spark plug.
noun
0
1
Such a discharge.
noun
0
1
To make or throw off sparks.
verb
0
1
To come forth as or like sparks.
verb
0
1
To produce the sparks properly.
verb
0
1
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A dashing, gallant young man.
noun
0
1
A beau or lover.
noun
0
1
(informal, former) To court, woo, pet, etc.
verb
0
1
(person) (born Muriel Sarah Camberg) 1918-2006; Brit. writer.
proper name
0
1
A small particle of glowing matter, either molten or on fire.
noun
0
1
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A short or small burst of electrical discharge.
noun
0
1
A small, shining body, or transient light; a sparkle.
noun
0
1
(figuratively) A small amount of something, such as an idea, that has the potential to become something greater, just as a spark can start a fire.
noun
0
1
(in plural sparks but treated as a singular) A ship's radio operator.
noun
0
1
(UK, slang) An electrician.
noun
0
1
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To trigger, kindle into activity (an argument, etc).
verb
0
1
(intransitive) To give off a spark or sparks.
verb
0
1
A gallant, a foppish young man.
noun
0
1
noun
0
1
To woo, court.
verb
0
1
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An incandescent particle, especially:
  • One thrown off from a burning substance.
  • One resulting from friction.
  • One remaining in an otherwise extinguished fire; an ember.
noun
0
2
The luminous phenomenon resulting from a disruptive discharge through an insulating material.
noun
0
2
To give off sparks.
verb
0
2
To operate correctly. Used of the ignition system of an internal-combustion engine.
verb
0
2
To set in motion; activate.

The incident sparked a controversy.

verb
0
2
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To court a woman or women.
verb
0
2
Any flash or sparkle of light like this.
noun
0
2
A tiny beginning or vestige, as of life, interest, excitement, etc.; particle or trace.
noun
0
2
(slang) A ship's radio operator.
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
spark
Plural:
Sparks

Origin of spark

  • Middle English sparke from Old English spearca V., from Middle English sparken from Old English spearcian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin or from spark

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English sparke, sperke, from Old English spearca, from Proto-Germanic *sparkô, *sprakô (cf. Dutch spark and sprank, Middle Low German sparke), from Proto-Indo-European *sp(h)er(e)g- (“to strew, sprinkle") (compare Breton erc'h (“snow"), Latin spargere (“to scatter, spread"), sparsus (“scattered"), Lithuanian sprógti (“to germinate"), Ancient Greek [script?] (spargân, “to swell"), Persian پراکن (parākan, “scatter, spread"), Avestan [script?] (frasparega, “branch, twig"), Sanskrit [script?] (Parjanva, “rain, rain god")).

    From Wiktionary

  • probably Scandinavian, akin to Old Norse sparkr 'sprightly'

    From Wiktionary