Twinkle meaning

twĭngkəl
To shine with slight, intermittent gleams, as distant lights or stars; flicker; glimmer.
verb
2
1
A slight, intermittent gleam of light; a sparkling flash; a glimmer.
noun
0
0
A sparkle of merriment or delight in the eye.
noun
0
0
A brief interval; a twinkling.
noun
0
0
A rapid to-and-fro movement.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To shine with quick, intermittent flashes of light, as some stars; sparkle.
verb
0
0
To light up, as with amusement.
verb
0
0
To move about or back and forth quickly and lightly, as a dancer's feet; flicker.
verb
0
0
To wink or blink.
verb
0
0
To make twinkle.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To emit (light) in quick, intermittent flashes.
verb
0
0
A flicker or wink of the eye.
noun
0
0
A quick flash of amusement, etc. in the eye.
noun
0
0
A quick, intermittent flash of light; sparkle.
noun
0
0
The very brief time it takes to wink; twinkling.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(of a source of light) To shine with a flickering light; to glimmer.

We could see the lights of the village twinkling in the distance.

verb
0
0
(chiefly of eyes) To be bright with delight.

His shrewd little eyes twinkled roguishly.

verb
0
0
To bat, blink or wink the eyes.
verb
0
0
To flit to and fro.
verb
0
0
A sparkle or glimmer of light.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A sparkle of delight in the eyes.

He was a rotund, jolly man with a twinkle in his eye.

noun
0
0
A flitting movement.
noun
0
0
To be bright or sparkling, as with merriment or delight.

Eyes that twinkled with joy.

verb
0
1
To blink or wink the eyes.
verb
0
1
To move about or to and fro rapidly and gracefully; flit.
verb
0
1
Advertisement
To emit (light) in slight, intermittent gleams.
verb
0
1

Origin of twinkle

  • Middle English twinklen from Old English twinclian frequentative of twincan to blink

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Old English twinclian

    From Wiktionary