Adjective definition

ăjĭk-tĭv
Frequency:
Dependent or subordinate.
adjective
33
13
(law) Of or relating to practice and procedure; procedural.
adjective
32
15
The part of speech that modifies a noun or other substantive by limiting, qualifying, or specifying and distinguished in English morphologically by one of several suffixes, such as -able, -ous, -er, and -est, or syntactically by position directly preceding a noun or nominal phrase.
noun
33
22
(law) Specifying the processes by which rights are enforced, as opposed to the establishing of such rights; remedial.

Adjective law.

adjective
28
18
Having the nature or function of an adjective.
adjective
18
9
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Adjectival.

An adjective clause.

adjective
14
7
Of an adjective.
adjective
13
6
Any of the words belonging to this part of speech, such as white in the phrase a white house.
noun
13
8
Any of a class of words used to modify a noun or other substantive, as by describing qualities of the entity denoted, stating its limits or quantity, or distinguishing it from others (Ex.: good, every, Aegean)
noun
12
7
Not standing alone; derivative or dependent.
adjective
9
7
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The definition of an adjective is a part of speech that is used to describe a noun.

Red, tall, better and fast are all examples of adjectives.

noun
2
1
(grammar) Adjectival; pertaining to or functioning as an adjective.
adjective
1
1
(law) Applying to methods of enforcement and rules of procedure.
adjective
1
1
(chemistry, of a dye) Needing the use of a mordant to be made fast to that which is being dyed.
adjective
1
1
(grammar) A word that modifies a noun or describes a noun’s referent.

The words “big” and “heavy” are English adjectives.

noun
1
1
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To make an adjective of; to form or convert into an adjective.
verb
1
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
adjective
Plural:
adjectives

Origin of adjective

  • Middle English from Old French adjectif from Late Latin adiectīvus from adiectus past participle of adicere to add to ad- ad- iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from Old French adjectif, from Latin adiectīvum, from ad (“next to”) + -iect-, perfect passive participle of iaciō (“throw”) + -īvus, adjective ending; hence, a word "thrown next to" a noun, modifying it.

    From Wiktionary