Fiend meaning

fēnd
Frequency:
To have an intense desire for something.

Fiended for the band's new release.

verb
4
1
(informal) One who is addicted to something.

A dope fiend.

noun
3
1
A fiend is defined as a person who is evil and cruel.

An example of a fiend is someone who is not kind to animals.

noun
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(religious, archaic) The enemy of mankind, specifically, the Devil; Satan.
noun
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The definition of a fiend is someone who obsesses over an activity or thing.

An example of a fiend is someone who does a lot of drugs (a drug fiend).

An example of a fiend is a constant shopper.

noun
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A devil or demon; a malignant or diabolical being; an evil spirit.
noun
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(informal) An addict.

A jazz fiend.

noun
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(informal) One who is completely absorbed in or obsessed with a given job or pastime.

A crossword-puzzle fiend.

noun
0
1
(informal) One who is particularly adept at something.

A fiend with computers.

noun
0
1
To crave (a drug, for example).

Fiended cocaine.

verb
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An evil spirit; devil.
noun
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A very evil person.
noun
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An inhumanly wicked or cruel person.
noun
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2
(epithet) the Fiend
  • Satan
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Fiend

Origin of fiend

  • Middle English from Old English fēond pē(i)- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English feend (“enemy, demon”), from Old English fēond (“enemy”), from Proto-Germanic *fijandz. Cognate with Old Norse fjándi (Icelandic fjandi, Danish fjende, Swedish fiende), West Frisian fijân, Low German Feend, Fiend, Dutch vijand, German Feind, Gothic (fijands), all of them meaning foe. The Old Norse and Gothic terms are present participles of the corresponding verbs fjá/fijan, to hate. Akin to Sanskrit पियति (piyati, “(he) reviles”).

    From Wiktionary