Tiger definition

tīgər
Frequency:
(US, slang) A person who is very athletic during sexual intercourse.
noun
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Any of several similar animals.
  • The South American jaguar.
  • The African leopard.
  • The Tasmanian wolf.
noun
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The definition of a tiger is a large, fierce cat from Asia having a tawny coat with black stripes, or a fierce person.

An example of a tiger is a Bengal.

An example of a tiger is a person who always goes after what she wants no matter what.

noun
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A very energetic or persevering person.
noun
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A person regarded as aggressive, audacious, or fierce.
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Any of various similar wild felines, such as the jaguar, mountain lion, or lynx.
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A fierce, belligerent person.
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Panthera tigris, a large predatory mammal of the cat family, indigenous to Asia.
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A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress.

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(South Africa, dated but still used) A leopard.
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(figuratively) A ferocious, bloodthirsty person.
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(US, colloquial) A kind of growl or screech, after cheering.

Three cheers and a tiger.

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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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A town in Georgia.
pronoun
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An unincorporated community in Washington.
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(soccer) Someone connected with Hull City Football Club, as a fan, player, coach etc.
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A large, fierce Asian cat (Panthera tigris), having a tawny coat striped with black.
noun
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A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera tigris) of Asia, having a tawny coat with transverse black stripes.
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have a tiger by the tail
  • to find oneself in a situation that has become unexpectedly difficult to manage or resolve
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tiger
Plural:
tigers

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of tiger

  • Middle English tigre from Old English tigras tigers and from Old French tigre both from Latin tigris from Greek of Iranian origin steig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English tygre, in part from Old English tigras (pl.), in part from Anglo-Norman tigre, both from Latin tigris, from Ancient Greek τίγρις (tígris), from Iranian (compare Avestan [script?] (tigri, “arrow"), [script?] (tiγra, “pointed")). More at stick.

    From Wiktionary