Lynx meaning

lĭngks
Frequency:
The long, silky, tawny fur of the lynx.
noun
2
1
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere, near Auriga and Gemini.
noun
1
1
Any of a genus (Lynx) of wildcats found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and characterized by a ruff on each side of the face, relatively long legs, a short tail, long, usually tufted ears, and keen vision, as the bobcat or Canada lynx of North America.
noun
1
1
A text-based Web browser created at the University of Kansas. Though largely supplanted by graphical browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer, Lynx is still popular among people with visual disabilities and those with very slow modem connections. See also Linux.
1
1
(place, proper) A N constellation between Auriga and Ursa Major.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A text-based Web browser that does not require a graphical user interface to display Web pages. Although the World Wide Web becomes more and more media rich in content, the number of purists who prefer text-only renderings of Web pages does not seem to shrink. Often, Lynx is the only solution for displaying Web pages over low bandwidth lines and on slow client computers.
0
1
Any of several medium-sized wild cats, mostly of the genus Lynx.
noun
0
1
(astronomy) A faint spring constellation of the northern sky. It lies north of the constellation Cancer.
pronoun
0
1
Any of several wildcats of the genus Lynx, especially L. canadensis of northern North America or L. lynx of Eurasia, having soft thick fur, a black-tipped short tail, and tufted ears.
noun
0
2

Origin of lynx

  • Middle English from Latin from Greek lunx leuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lynx, from Latin lynx, from Ancient Greek λύγξ (lunx), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (“white; light; bright"), because of the cat's glowing eyes and ability to see in the dark. Replaced Old English lox.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin lynx (“lynx"). Named by the astronomer Johannes Hevelius in 1687. The constellation is said to be so faint that one needs the eyes of a lynx to see it.

    From Wiktionary