Angel Definition

ānjəl
angels
noun
angels
A messenger of God.
Webster's New World
A typically benevolent celestial being that acts as an intermediary between heaven and earth, especially in Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and Zoroastrianism.
American Heritage
A supernatural being, either good or bad, to whom are attributed greater than human power, intelligence, etc.
Webster's New World
A conventionalized image of a white-robed figure in human form with wings and a halo.
Webster's New World
The last of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology. From the highest to the lowest in rank, the orders are: seraphim, cherubim, thrones, dominations or dominions, virtues, powers, principalities, archangels, and angels.
American Heritage
Synonyms:
penatesvirtuespetkinsdominationsbaby-dollangelologyalmsgiverchickabiddyprincipalitiesrishiangel-fallsholy personholy mansaintbacker
Antonyms:
fienddemondevil
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verb
To support with money.
Webster's New World
anagram
Wiktionary
Wiktionary
Wiktionary
Wiktionary
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pronoun

A male given name used since 16th century, from Latin Angelus or an anglicized spelling of Ángel.

Wiktionary

A surname​ originating as a nickname or, rarely, as a patronymic.

Wiktionary
A female given name of modern usage from the English noun angel.
Wiktionary
(baseball) A player on the team the "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim".
Wiktionary
other
A wealthy individual who agrees to invest money with a start-up company in what is likely its first funding. Angels invest even before venture capital firms do so. Typically, the amount of money invested by an angel is smaller than the amount that would be received from a venture capitalist, and may be $10,000 up to about $200,000. Angel also is used in the context of a fallen angel, which is a bond that has been reduced to junk status.
Webster's New World Finance
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Other Word Forms of Angel

Noun

Singular:
angel
Plural:
angels

Origin of Angel

  • From Middle English angel, aungel, ængel, engel, from Anglo-Norman angele, angle and Old English ængel, engel (“angel, messenger”), possibly via an early Proto-Germanic *angiluz but ultimately from Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos, “messenger”). Cognate with Scots angel (“angel”), West Frisian ingel (“angel”), Dutch engel (“angel”), Low German engel (“angel”), German Engel (“angel”), Swedish ängel (“angel”), Icelandic engill (“angel”), Gothic (aggilus, “angel, messenger”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English aungel from Old English engel or Old French angele both from Late Latin angelus from Late Greek angelos from Greek messenger

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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