Patron definitions

pā'trən
A person empowered with the granting of an English church benefice.
noun
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noun
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One that supports, protects, or champions someone or something, such as an institution, event, or cause; a sponsor or benefactor.

A patron of the arts.

noun
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A person corresponding in some respects to a father; protector; benefactor.
noun
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1
A customer, especially a regular customer.
noun
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A person, usually a wealthy and influential one, who sponsors and supports some person, activity, institution, etc.

The patrons of the orchestra.

noun
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1
The owner or manager of an establishment, especially a restaurant or an inn of France or Spain.
noun
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A customer, esp. a regular customer, of a store, restaurant, etc.
noun
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1
One who possesses the right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.
noun
44
1
In ancient Rome, a person who had freed a slave but still retained a certain paternal control over him or her.
noun
43
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A patron saint.
noun
41
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One who protects or supports; a defender.
noun
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The definition of a patron is a regular customer of an establishment or someone who provides financial support to some person or cause, such as a patron of the arts.

An example of a patron is a person who goes to eat at the same restaurant every week.

An example of a patron is a wealthy lady who gives a lot of money to a small local art gallery.

noun
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An influential, wealthy person who supported an artist, craftsman, a scholar or a noble.
noun
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This car park is for patrons only.

noun
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A property owner who hires a contractor for construction works.
noun
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(historical, Roman antiquity) A master who had freed his slave but still retained some paternal rights over him.
noun
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An advocate or pleader.
noun
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(UK, ecclestiastical) One who has gift and disposition of a benefice.
noun
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(nautical) A padrone.
noun
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(obsolete) To be a patron of; to patronize; to favour.

verb
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Origin of patron

Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin patrōnus from Latin from pater patr- father pəter- in Indo-European roots