Dyad definition

dīăd, -əd
Frequency:
(biology) One pair of homologous chromosomes resulting from the division of a tetrad during meiosis.
noun
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Two individuals or units regarded as a pair.

The mother-daughter dyad.

noun
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A function that draws a correspondence from any vector u to the vector ( v·u ) w and is denoted vw , where v and w are a fixed pair of vectors and v·u is the scalar product of v and u . For example, if v = (2,3,1), w = (0,−1,4), and u = ( a,b,c ), then the dyad vw draws a correspondence from u to (2 a + 3 b + c ) w .
noun
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A tensor formed from a vector in a vector space and a linear functional on that vector space.
noun
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Made up of two units.
adjective
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Two units regarded as one; pair.
noun
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(biol.) A double chromosome resulting from the division of a tetrad in meiosis; half of a tetrad.
noun
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(chem.) An atom, element, or radical with a valence of two.
noun
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(sociology) Two persons in a continuing relationship involving interaction.
noun
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Two individuals or units regarded as a pair.

The mother-daughter dyad.

noun
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0
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(biology) One pair of homologous chromosomes resulting from the division of a tetrad during meiosis.
noun
0
0
Made up of two units.
adjective
0
0
A set of two elements treated as one; a pair.
noun
0
0
(music) Any set of two different pitch classes.
noun
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A pair of things standing in particular relation; dyadic relation.
noun
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(chemistry) An element, atom, or radical having a valence or combining power of two.
noun
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Consisting of two.
adjective
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
dyad
Plural:
dyads

Origin of dyad

  • From Greek duas duad- from duo two dwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek δύας (dýas), δύαδ- (dýad-) from Ancient Greek δύο (dýo) from Ancient Greek δύο (duo), from Proto-Indo-European *duwó,*duwéh₃ (*dwóh₁). “dyad” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.

    From Wiktionary