See Definition

saw, seeing, seen, sees
verb
saw, seeing, seen, sees
To get knowledge or an awareness of through the eyes; perceive visually; look at; view.
Webster's New World
To discern objects, colors, etc. by using the eyes.
To be able to see far.
Webster's New World
To get a clear mental impression of; grasp by thinking; understand.
To see the point of a joke.
Webster's New World
To investigate or inquire.
See if he wants anything.
Webster's New World
To accept as right, proper, or suitable.
I can't see him as president.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
Antonyms:
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noun
sees
The official seat, or center of authority, of a bishop.
Webster's New World
The position, authority, or jurisdiction of a bishop.
Webster's New World
A cathedra.
American Heritage
A seat of authority, esp. a throne.
Webster's New World

A diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.

Wiktionary
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interjection
Look; behold.
Webster's New World
idiom
see red
  • To be extremely angry.
American Heritage
see the light
  • To understand or realize something after a period of ignorance or misunderstanding.
  • To undergo a religious awakening or conversion.
American Heritage
see you later
  • Used to express goodbye.
American Heritage
(I'll) be seeing you
  • farewell; goodbye
Webster's New World
see about
  • to investigate or inquire into
  • to attend to
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of See

Noun

Singular:
see
Plural:
sees

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to See

Origin of See

  • From Middle English seen, from Old English sÄ“on (“to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know"), from Proto-Germanic *sehwanÄ… (“to see"), from Proto-Indo-European *sekÊ·- (“to see, notice"). Cognate with West Frisian sjen (“to see"), Dutch zien (“to see"), Low German sehn, German sehen (“to see"), Danish and Swedish se (“to see"), and more distantly with Latin sÄ«gnum (“sign, token"), Albanian shih (“look at, see") imp. of shoh (“to see").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin sedes (“seat"), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (“to sit").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old French se from Vulgar Latin sedem from Latin sēdēs seat sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English sen from Old English sēon sekw-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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