See meaning

To have foresight.
verb
9
1
(obsolete) A cathedra.
noun
5
2
To take care; make sure.

See that he does it right.

verb
4
0
Look; behold.
interjection
4
1
To be a spectator at; view or attend.

To see a show.

verb
3
1
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To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight.
verb
2
0
(figuratively) To understand.

Do you see what I mean?

verb
2
0
To admit to one's presence; receive.

Too ill to see anyone.

verb
1
0
(poker) To equal (the preceding bet) or equal the bet of (the preceding bettor); call.
verb
1
0
To discern objects, colors, etc. by using the eyes.

To be able to see far.

verb
1
0
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To comprehend; understand.
verb
1
0
To think over a given matter; reflect.

Let me see, where did I put it?

verb
1
0
The official seat, or center of authority, of a bishop.
noun
1
0
To form a mental picture of.
verb
1
0
To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.

To go to see a friend.

verb
1
0
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(by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.

I'll see you hang for this! I saw that they didn't make any more trouble.

verb
1
0
(gambling) To respond to another player's bet with a bet of equal value.

I'll see your twenty dollars and raise you ten.

verb
1
0
To date frequently.

I've been seeing her for two months.

verb
1
0
(sometimes mystical) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.

The oracle saw the destruction of the city.

verb
1
0
To see is to use your eyes to look at things or that something is visible to you.

An example of see is when you get new glasses to improve your vision.

An example of see is when you spot your cousin at the mall.

verb
1
1
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The official seat, center of authority, jurisdiction, or office of a bishop.
noun
1
1
To have personal knowledge of; experience; witness; live through.

To have seen two wars.

verb
1
1
To look over; inspect; examine.

Let me see that burn.

verb
1
1
The position, authority, or jurisdiction of a bishop.
noun
1
1
(obs.) A seat of authority, esp. a throne.
noun
1
1
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A diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
noun
1
1
The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric.
noun
1
1
A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
noun
1
1
To have the power of sight.
verb
0
0
To witness or observe by personal experience.

Now I've seen it all! Michael saw Will off at the train station.

I have been blind since birth and I love to read Braille. When the books arrive in from the library, I can't wait to see what stories they have sent me.

I saw military service in Vietnam.

verb
0
0
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(informal) see red
  • To be extremely angry.
idiom
0
0
see the light
  • To understand or realize something after a period of ignorance or misunderstanding.
  • To undergo a religious awakening or conversion.
idiom
1
0
see you later
  • Used to express goodbye.
idiom
1
0
(I'll) be seeing you
  • farewell; goodbye
idiom
1
0
see about
  • to investigate or inquire into
  • to attend to
idiom
1
0
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see after
  • to take care of; look after
idiom
0
0
see double
  • to see two of every object through inability to focus the eyes, as from drunkenness
idiom
0
0
see fit
  • to consider that it is desirable, proper, etc.
    Go if you see fit; he saw fit to sue them.
idiom
1
0
see here!
  • used to express an objection
idiom
1
0
see into
  • to investigate; look into
  • to perceive the true meaning, character, or nature of
idiom
0
0
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see off
  • to go with (another) to the place from which that person is to leave, as on a journey
idiom
0
0
(rare) see out
  • to carry out; finish; go through with
  • to wait till the end of
idiom
0
0
see through
  • to perceive the true meaning, character, or nature of
    We saw through his smooth talk.
  • to carry out to the end; finish
    To see a project through.
  • to help out or carry through a time of difficulty
    saw her through her final exams.
idiom
0
0
see to
  • to attend to
idiom
0
0
see you (later)
  • I'll be seeing you; goodbye
idiom
0
0
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Origin of see

  • Middle English from Old French se from Vulgar Latin sedem from Latin sēdēs seat sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English sen from Old English sēon sekw-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English seen, from Old English sÄ“on (“to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know"), from Proto-Germanic *sehwanÄ… (“to see"), from Proto-Indo-European *sekÊ·- (“to see, notice"). Cognate with West Frisian sjen (“to see"), Dutch zien (“to see"), Low German sehn, German sehen (“to see"), Danish and Swedish se (“to see"), and more distantly with Latin sÄ«gnum (“sign, token"), Albanian shih (“look at, see") imp. of shoh (“to see").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin sedes (“seat"), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (“to sit").

    From Wiktionary