Bishop meaning

bĭshəp
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A high-ranking Christian cleric, in modern churches usually in charge of a diocese and in some churches regarded as having received the highest ordination in unbroken succession from the apostles.
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The definition of a bishop is a senior member of the Christian clergy that is often in charge of a diocese and able to oversee priests, or a chess piece.

The Christian religious leader who oversees the priests in your parish is an example of a bishop.

A piece in chess that you have two of when you start the game and that moves along the diagonal is an example of a bishop.

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(games) A usually miter-shaped chess piece that can move diagonally across any number of unoccupied spaces.
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Mulled port spiced with oranges, sugar, and cloves.
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A chess piece that can move in a diagonal direction only, over any number of unoccupied squares of the same color.
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A hot, sweet drink of port wine flavored with an orange stuck with cloves.
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(person) 1911-79; U.S. poet.
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A high-ranking official in the Catholic church who governs a diocese, or a similar official in other denominations and religions. (Occasionally abbreviated as Bp. when used as a title.)
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(chess) A piece that may be moved only diagonally.

The bishop is confined to squares of a single color.

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A spiritual overseer, superintendent, or director.
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A drink made from wine, oranges or lemons, and sugar.

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(US, archaic) A woman's bustle.
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(slang) Penis (see bash the bishop).
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(now historical) To admit into the church by confirmation; to confirm.
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(obsolete) To make (a horse) seem younger, by cutting its teeth short, then scooping out an oval cavity in the corner nippers and burning it black with a hot iron.

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Origin of bishop

  • Middle English from Old English bisceope from Vulgar Latin ebiscopus from Late Latin episcopus from Late Greek episkopos from Greek overseer epi- epi- skopos watcher spek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bishop, from Old English biscop (“bishop”), from Vulgar Latin *biscopus, from Latin episcopus (“overseer, supervisor”), from Ancient Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos, “overseer”), from ἐπί (epi, “over”) + σκοπέω (skopeō, “I examine”). Cognate with West Frisian biskop (“bishop”), Dutch bisschop (“bishop”), German Bischof (“bishop”), Swedish biskop (“bishop”), Norwegian biskop (“bishop”), Icelandic biskup (“bishop”), Gothic [script?] (aipiskaupus, “bishop”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From the surname of the person who first practised it.

    From Wiktionary