Send meaning

sĕnd
Send is defined as to direct, order or cause to go.

An example of send is to mail a letter.

verb
3
1
To send a message, messenger, emissary, etc.

To send for help.

verb
2
0
To dispatch, as by a communications medium.

Send a message by radio.

verb
1
0
To hit so as to direct or propel with force; drive.

The batter sent the ball to left field. The slap on my back sent me staggering.

verb
1
0
To cause to be conveyed by an intermediary to a destination.

Send goods by plane.

verb
1
1
Advertisement
To cause to take place or occur.

We will meet whatever vicissitudes fate may send.

verb
0
0
To transmit a message or messages.

The radio operator was still sending when the ship went down.

verb
0
0
To ask, direct, or command to go.

Send the boy home.

verb
0
0
To arrange for the going of; enable to go or attend.

To send one's son to college.

verb
0
0
To cause or force to move, as by releasing, hitting, discharging, throwing, etc.

He sent the ball over the fence.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To bring or drive into some state or condition.

Sent him to his ruin.

verb
0
0
To cause to happen, come, etc.; give.

A misfortune sent by the gods.

verb
0
0
To make very excited or exhilarated; thrill.
verb
0
0
To transmit, as by radio.
verb
0
0
The driving motion of a wave or the sea.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
To be plunged forward, as by a wave.
verb
0
0
verb
0
0
To make something (such as an object or message) go from one place to another.

Every day at two o'clock, he sends his secretary out to buy him a coffee.

To send a message, or a letter.

verb
0
0
(slang, dated) To excite, delight, or thrill (someone).
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To bring to a certain condition.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To dispatch an agent or messenger to convey a message, or to do an errand.

Seeing how ill she was, we sent for a doctor at once.

verb
0
0
To cause to be or to happen; to bestow; to inflict; to grant; sometimes followed by a dependent proposition.
verb
0
0
(nautical) To pitch.
verb
0
0
(telecommunications) An operation in which data is transmitted.

Sends and receives.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(nautical) Alternative form of scend.

The send of the sea. "” Longfellow.

noun
0
0
To dispatch someone to do an errand or convey a message.

Let's send out for hamburgers.

verb
0
1
To dispatch a request or order, especially by mail.

Send away for a new catalogue.

verb
0
1
send flying
  • To cause to be knocked or scattered about with force:.
    A blow to the table that sent the dishes flying.
idiom
0
0
send packing
  • To dismiss (someone) abruptly.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
send around
  • To put into circulation.
idiom
0
0
send away
  • To dispatch or banish.
idiom
0
0
send down
  • To suspend or expel from a university.
idiom
0
0
send flying
  • To dismiss or cause to depart hurriedly.
  • To stagger or repel, as with a blow.
  • To put to flight; rout.
  • To scatter abruptly in all directions.
idiom
0
0
send for
  • To ask for the arrival of; summon.
  • To place an order for; make a request for delivery of.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
send forth
  • To be a source of; cause to appear; give out or forth; produce, emit, utter, etc.
idiom
0
0
send in
  • To dispatch, hand in, or send to a central point or to one receiving.
  • To put (a player) into a game or contest.
idiom
0
0
send off
  • To mail or dispatch (a letter, gift, etc.).
  • To dismiss.
  • To give a send-off to.
idiom
0
0
send out
  • To dispatch, distribute, issue, mail, etc. from a central point.
  • To send forth.
  • To send someone on an errand (for something).
idiom
0
0
send out for
  • To place an order for (food, etc.) to be delivered.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
send up
  • To cause to rise, climb, or go up.
  • To sentence to prison.
  • To make seem ridiculous, esp. by parody.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of send

  • Middle English senden from Old English sendan sent- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English senden (“to send"), from Old English sendan (“to send, cause to go"), from Proto-Germanic *sandijanÄ… (“to cause to go"), from *sinþanÄ… (“to go, journey"), from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (“to walk, travel"). Cognate with Dutch zenden (“to send"), Norwegian and Danish sende (“to send"), German senden (“to send"), Old English sand, sond (“a sending, mission, message"), Albanian endem (“I roam around, wander").

    From Wiktionary