Feel meaning

fēl
The definition of feel is the perception or sensation of something or the sense of touch.

An example of feel is when you go to a store and think it seems high end.

An example of feel is when you run your hand over silk and it is smooth and soft.

noun
7
1
To appear to be to the senses, esp. to the sense of touch.

The water feels warm.

verb
4
1
To experience the sensation of touch.
verb
4
2
An emotional sensation or effect.

The feel of happiness.

noun
4
2
An act of fondling.

She gave me a quick feel to show that she loves me.

noun
3
1
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Alternative form of fele.
adjective
3
2
(US, slang) To understand.

I don't want you back here, ya feel me?

verb
2
0
To test or explore with caution.

Feel one's way in a new job.

verb
2
1
To seek or explore something by the sense of touch.

Felt for the light switch in the dark.

verb
2
1
To feel is defined as to be aware of someone or something touching you, to explore something by touch, using your sense of touch to guide you or experiencing emotions.

An example of feel is when you are aware of someone touching your arm.

An example of feel is when you run your hand over fabric.

An example of feel is when you make your way through your house in the dark by touching various things in the house.

An example of feel is when you are happy.

verb
2
2
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To have compassion or sympathy.

I feel for him in his troubles.

verb
1
1
The sense of touch.

A surface that is rough to the feel.

noun
1
1
An overall impression or effect.
noun
1
1
Intuitive awareness or natural ability.

Has a feel for decorating.

noun
1
1
To perceive or be aware of through physical sensation.

To feel rain on one's face.

verb
1
1
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To be aware of through intellectual perception.

To feel the weight of an argument.

verb
1
1
To have physical sensation; be sentient.
verb
1
1
To have the indicated emotional effect.

It feels good to be needed.

verb
1
1
To try to find something by touching; grope (for)
verb
1
1
To be, or be aware of being.

To feel sad, sick, certain, etc.

verb
1
1
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To be moved to sympathy, pity, etc. (for)
verb
1
1
The act of feeling; perception by the senses.
noun
1
1
The sense of touch.
noun
1
1
The nature of a thing as perceived through touch.

The feel of wet sawdust.

noun
1
1
An instinctive ability or appreciation.

A feel for floral arrangement.

noun
1
1
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(slang) The act or an instance of touching, handling, groping, etc.

Have a feel of this fabric.

noun
1
1
To use the sense of touch.
  • (copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on.
    You can feel a heartbeat if you put your fingers on your breast.
    I felt downright hot and miserable evening at night.
  • To find one's way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements.
    I felt my way through the darkened room.
    I felt my way cautiously through the dangerous business maneuver.
  • (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing.
  • (intransitive) To search by sense of touch.
    He felt for the light switch in the dark.
verb
1
1
To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.
  • To experience an emotion or other mental state about.
    I can feel the sadness in his poems.
  • To think, believe, or have an impression concerning.
    I feel that we need to try harder.
  • (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state.
    He obviously feels strongly about it.
    She felt even more upset when she heard the details.
  • (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected.
    I feel for you and your plight.
verb
1
1
To be or become aware of.
verb
1
1
To experience the consequences of.

Feel my wrath!

verb
1
1
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(copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise).

It looks like wood, but it feels more like plastic.

This is supposed to be a party, but it feels more like a funeral!

verb
0
1
A quality of an object experienced by touch.

Bark has a rough feel.

noun
0
1

You should get a feel of the area before moving in.

noun
0
1
A vague understanding.

I'm getting a feel for what you mean.

noun
0
1

She has a feel for music.

noun
0
1
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Alternative form of feeling.

I know that feel.

noun
0
1
Alternative form of fele.
pronoun
0
1
To be conscious of a specified kind or quality of physical, mental, or emotional state.

Felt warm and content; feels strongly about the election.

verb
0
2
Perception by touch or by sensation of the skin.

A feel of autumn in the air.

noun
0
2
To touch or handle in order to become aware of; examine or test by touching or handling.
verb
0
2
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To think or believe, often for unanalyzed or emotional reasons.

He feels that we should go.

verb
0
2
feel in (one's) bones
  • To have an intuition of.
idiom
0
1
(informal) feel like
  • To have an inclination or desire for:
    Felt like going for a walk.
idiom
0
1
feel like (oneself)
  • To sense oneself as being in one's normal state of health or spirits:
    I just don't feel like myself today.
idiom
0
1
feel (one's) oats
  • To be energetic and playful.
  • To act in a self-important manner.
idiom
0
1
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feel like
  • to have an inclination or desire for
    I feel like some ice cream.
  • to think or believe that
    I feel like he's a fool.
idiom
0
1
feel (like) oneself
  • to feel normally healthy, fit, etc.
idiom
0
0
feel out
  • to find out the opinions or attitude of by a cautious and indirect approach
idiom
0
1
feel strongly about
  • to have decided opinions concerning
idiom
0
1
feel up
  • to fondle sexually
idiom
0
1
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feel one's way
  • to move or advance cautiously, by or as if by groping
idiom
0
1

Origin of feel

  • Middle English felen from Old English fēlan pāl- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan (“to feel, perceive, touch”), from Proto-Germanic *fōlijaną (“to taste, feel”), from Proto-Indo-European *pelem-, *pal- (“to swing, shake”). Cognate with Scots fele (“to feel”), West Frisian fiele (“to sense, feel”), Dutch voelen (“to feel”), Low German fölen (“to feel”), föhlen, German fühlen (“to feel”), Danish føle (“to feel”), and through Indo-European, with Latin palpō (“touch, feel, caress, pat”), Ancient Greek πάλλω (pállō, “swing, shake, shake loose”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English feele, fele, feole, from Old English fela, feala, feolo (“much, many”), from Proto-Germanic *felu (“very, much”), from Proto-Indo-European *pélu- (“many”). Cognate with Scots fele (“much, many, great”), Dutch veel (“much, many”), German viel (“much, many”), Latin plūs (“more”), Ancient Greek πολύς (polýs, “many”). Related to full.

    From Wiktionary