Felt definitions

fĕlt
Made of felt.
adjective
67
1
A fabric of wool, often mixed with fur or hair or with cotton, rayon, etc., the fibers being worked together by pressure, heat, chemical action, etc. instead of by weaving or knitting.
noun
64
1
Made of, relating to, or resembling felt.
adjective
63
0
Any fabric or material with a fuzzy, springy surface like that of felt; esp., a heavy insulating material made of asbestos fibers matted together.
noun
61
1
Something made of this fabric.
noun
60
1
Anything made of felt.
noun
58
1
To make into felt.
verb
57
0
To become matted together.
verb
55
1
To cover with felt.
verb
54
0
To cause (fibers) to mat together.
verb
52
0
To press or mat (something) together.
verb
51
0
verb
49
1
To become like felt; mat together.
verb
48
1
The definition of felt is a fabric made of animal fibers that have been twisted and pressed together.

An example of felt is flat pieces of dyed wool that are used in children's crafting projects.

noun
24
0
Felt is defined as to twist and compress animal fibers together to create a matted fabric.

An example of felt is putting a wool knit purse in the washing machine with hot water for a long time causing the fabric to mat up into a springy pad.

verb
21
0
Felt means to have had a feeling.

An example of felt is someone feeling another person touch their arm.

verb
18
0
A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
noun
3
0
That has been experienced or perceived.
adjective
3
0
A hat made of felt.
noun
0
0
To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together.

verb
0
0
To cover with, or as if with, felt.

To felt the cylinder of a steam engine.

verb
0
0
Simple past tense and past participle of feel.
verb
0
0

Origin of felt

Old English felt, from Proto-Germanic *feltaz (compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso 'felt' (compare Latin pilleus (“felt”) (adj.), Old Church Slavonic рлъсть (plŭstĭ), Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος (pilos)), from *pel- 'to beat'. More at anvil.