Mood meaning

mo͝od
A pervading impression of an observer.

The somber mood of the painting.

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Inclination; disposition.

I'm in the mood for ice cream.

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A property of verbs in which the speaker's attitude toward the factuality or likelihood of the action or condition expressed.
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A state of mind or emotion.
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A category or set of verb forms or inflections used to indicate such an attitude. In English, the indicative mood is used to make factual statements, the subjunctive mood to indicate doubt or unlikelihood, and the imperative mood to express a command.
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A particular state of mind or feeling; humor or temper.
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A predominant or pervading feeling, spirit, or tone.
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Fits of morose, sullen, or uncertain temper.
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Anger.
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Any of the various forms of valid syllogisms, as determined by the quantity and quality of their constituent propositions.
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A characteristic of verbs that involves the speaker's attitude toward the action expressed, indicating whether this is regarded as a fact (indicative mood), as a matter of supposition, desire, possibility, etc. (subjunctive mood), or as a command (imperative mood); also, an analytic category based on this characteristic (mood is shown by inflection, as in Latin, or analytically with auxiliaries, as English may, might, should, or by both)
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Any of the forms a verb takes to indicate this characteristic.
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I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.

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A sullen mental state; a bad mood.

He's in a mood with me today.

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A disposition to do something.

I'm not in the mood for running today.

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A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.

A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.

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(grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker's or writer's wish, intent, or assertion about reality.

The most common mood in English is the indicative.

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Mood is a feeling.

An example of mood is someone who is grumpy.

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A particular state of mind or emotion.

News that put us in a good mood.

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An instance or spell of sulking or angry behavior.

A friend's visit lifted him out of his mood.

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The arrangement or form of a syllogism.
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Origin of mood

From Middle English mood, mode, mod, from Old English mōd (“heart, mind, spirit, mood, temper; courage; arrogance, pride; power, violence"), from Proto-Germanic *mōdÄ…, *mōdaz (“sense, courage, zeal, anger"), from Proto-Indo-European *mō-, *mÄ“- (“endeavour, will, temper"). Cognate with Scots mude, muid (“mood, courage, spirit, temper, disposition"), West Frisian moed (“mind, spirit, courage, will, intention"), Dutch moed (“courage, bravery, heart, valor"), Low German Mōt, MÅ«t (“mind, heart, courage"), German Mut (“courage, braveness, heart, spirit"), Swedish mod (“courage, heart, bravery"), Icelandic móður (“wrath, grief, moodiness"), Latin mōs (“will, humour, wont, inclination, mood"), Russian сметь (smetʹ, “to dare, venture").