Freak meaning

frēk
The definition of a freak is an unexpected event or a person who does not fit in with the mainstream.

An example of freak is a snowstorm in July.

An example of freak is an outcast who doesn't fit in with anyone and who everyone stays away from because they find them to be odd.

noun
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Freak is defined as to act out or to cause someone to act in a wild manner or to become very upset, agitated or excited.

An example of freak is someone who is dancing around and shouting and screaming because he has just won the lottery.

An example of freak is when someone gets very angry and starts yelling and breaking things for little or no reason.

An example of freak is when you say something to someone that causes him to become upset and start yelling and acting overly excited.

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A thing or occurrence that is markedly unusual or irregular.

A freak of nature produced the midsummer snow.

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An abnormally formed organism, especially one regarded as a curiosity.
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A sudden capricious turn of mind; a whim.
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Oddly different from what is usual or normal; odd; abnormal.

Freak weather.

adjective
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Highly unusual or irregular.

A freak accident; a freak storm.

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To experience or cause to experience frightening hallucinations or feelings of paranoia, especially as a result of taking a drug. Often used with out.
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To behave or cause to behave irrationally and uncontrollably. Often used with out.
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To become or cause to become greatly excited or upset. Often used with out.
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A fleck or streak of color.
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To speckle or streak with color.
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Any abnormal animal, person, or plant; monstrosity.
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Capriciousness.
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A postage stamp with an error that occurred in the printing or perforation process and is unique to the one stamp.
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Freak out (see phrase)
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To streak or fleck.
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A man, particularly a bold, strong, vigorous man.
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(UK dialectal, Scotland) A fellow; a petulant, young man.
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A sudden causeless change or turn of the mind; a whim of fancy; a capricious prank; a vagary or caprice.
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Someone or something that is markedly unusual.
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A drug addict.
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(of a person) A nonconformist, especially in appearance, social behavior, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or business practices; an oddball, especially in physiology (i.e., "circus freak"); unique, sometimes in a displeasing way.
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(bodybuilding) A person whose physique has grown far beyond the normal limits of muscular development; often a bodybuilder weighing more than 120 kilos (260 pounds).
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An enthusiast, or person who has an obsession with, or extreme knowledge of, something.

Bob's a real video-game freak. He owns every games console of the last ten years.

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(informal, sometimes affectionate) A very sexually perverse individual.

She's a freak in the sack!

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To make greatly distressed and/or a discomposed appearance.
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To be placed or place someone under the influence of a psychedelic drug.
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(intransitive) To experience reality withdrawal, or hallucinations (nightmarish), to behave irrational or unconventional due to drug use.
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(intransitive) To react extremely or irrationally, usually under distress or discomposure.
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freak out
  • To experience, esp. in an extreme way, the mental reactions, hallucinations, etc. induced by a psychedelic drug.
  • To make or become very excited, distressed, disorganized, etc.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of freak

  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From freak
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English freke, freike (“a bold man, warrior, man, creature”), from Old English freca (“a bold man, warrior, hero”), from Proto-Germanic *frekô (“an active or eagre man, warrior, wolf”), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz (“active, bold, desirous, greedy”), from Proto-Indo-European *pereg-, *spereg- (“to shrug, be quick, twitch, splash, blast”). Cognate with Old Norse freki (“greedy or avaricious one, a wolf”), Old High German freh (“eager”), Old English frēcne (“dangerous, daring, courageous, bold”).
    From Wiktionary
  • 1560, "sudden change of mind, whim", of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Old English frician (“to leap, dance”), or Middle English frek (“insolent, daring”), from Old English frec (“desirous, greedy, eager, bold, daring”), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz, *frakaz (“hard, efficient, greedy, bold, audacious”). Compare Old High German freh (“eager”), Old English frēcne (“dangerous, daring, courageous, bold”).
    From Wiktionary