Prick meaning

prĭk
(vulgar slang) A person considered to be mean or contemptible, especially a man.
noun
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(vulgar slang) A penis.
noun
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(chiefly british) A hare's track or footprint.
noun
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To prick is to use a sharp point to make a small hole.

An example of prick is for a rose bush thorn to stick into your finger.

verb
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The definition of a prick is a very small hole made by something sharp.

An example of a prick is what you'd have in your thumb after accidently stabbing yourself with a needle.

noun
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To spur (a horse).
verb
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To affect with a mental or emotional pang, as of sorrow or remorse.

Criticism that pricked his conscience.

verb
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To impel as if with a spur; stimulate or provoke.
verb
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To mark or delineate on a surface by means of small punctures.

Prick a pattern on a board.

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To pierce the quick of (a horse's hoof) while shoeing.
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To transplant (seedlings, for example) before final planting.
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To cause to stand erect or point upward.

The dogs pricked their ears.

verb
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To pierce or puncture something or cause a pricking feeling.
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To feel a pang or twinge from being pricked.
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To stand erect; point upward.

The dog's ears pricked at the noise.

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A very small puncture or, formerly, dot, made by a sharp point.
noun
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(archaic) Any of various pointed objects, as a thorn, goad, etc.
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noun
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To make (a tiny hole) in (something) with a sharp point.
verb
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To cause to feel sharp pain in.

Remorse pricked his conscience.

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To mark or trace by dots, points, or punctures.
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To pierce (a horse's foot) to the quick in shoeing, causing lameness.
verb
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To cause to point or stick up.
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(archaic) To spur or urge on; goad; incite.
verb
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To cause or feel a slight, sharp pain.
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To have a prickly or stinging sensation; tingle.
verb
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To point or stick up.
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(archaic) To spur a horse on; ride fast.
verb
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Carried stiffly erect.
adjective
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A small mark or puncture made by a pointed object.
noun
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A small hole or perforation, caused by piercing. [from 10th c.]
noun
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An indentation or small mark made with a pointed object. [from 10th c.]
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A small pointed object. [from 10th c.]
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The experience or feeling of being pierced or punctured by a small, sharp object. [from 13th c.]

I felt a sharp prick as the nurse took a sample of blood.

noun
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(slang, vulgar) The penis. [from 16th c.]
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(slang, pejorative) Someone (especially a man or boy) who is unpleasant, rude or annoying. [from 16th c.]
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(now historical) A small roll of yarn or tobacco. [from 17th c.]
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The footprint of a hare.
noun
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To pierce or puncture slightly. [from 11th c.]

John hardly felt the needle prick his arm when the adept nurse drew blood.

verb
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To form by piercing or puncturing.

To prick holes in paper.

To prick a pattern for embroidery.

To prick the notes of a musical composition.

verb
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(intransitive, dated) To be punctured; to suffer or feel a sharp pain, as by puncture.

A sore finger pricks.

verb
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To incite, stimulate, goad. [from 13th c.]
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To affect with sharp pain; to sting, as with remorse.
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(intransitive, archaic) To urge one's horse on; to ride quickly. [from 14th c.]

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(chiefly nautical) To mark the surface of (something) with pricks or dots; especially, to trace a ship's course on (a chart). [from 16th c.]
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To make acidic or pungent.

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(intransitive) To become sharp or acid; to turn sour, as wine.
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To aim at a point or mark.

verb
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To fix by the point; to attach or hang by puncturing.

To prick a knife into a board.

verb
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Sir Walter Scott.

Let the soldiers for duty be carefully pricked off.

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Shakespeare.

Those many, then, shall die: their names are pricked.

verb
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To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; said especially of the ears of an animal, such as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up.
verb
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(farriery) To drive a nail into (a horse's foot), so as to cause lameness.
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
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A small mark or puncture made by a pointed object.
noun
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A pointed object, such as an ice pick, goad, or thorn.
noun
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A sharp pain caused by or as if by being pricked.
noun
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prick up (one's) ears
  • To listen with attentive interest.
idiom
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prick out
  • to transplant (seedlings) as from seed pans to shallow boxes
idiom
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prick up one's ears
  • to raise the ears with the points upward
  • to listen closely
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of prick

  • Middle English from Old English prica puncture

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English prik, prikke, from Old English prica, pricu (“a sharp point, minute mark, spot, dot, small portion, prick"), from Proto-Germanic *prik- (“a prick, point"). Cognate with West Frisian prik (“small hole"), Dutch prik (“point, small stick"), Danish prik (“dot"), Icelandic prik (“dot, small stick"). Pejorative context came from prickers, or witch-hunters.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English prikken, from Old English prician (“to prick"), from Proto-Germanic *prik- (“to pierce, prick"). Cognate with English dialectal pritch, Dutch prikken (“to prick, sting"), Middle High German pfrecken (“to prick"), Swedish pricka (“to dot, prick").

    From Wiktionary