Intelligence Definition

ĭn-tĕlə-jəns
noun
The ability to learn or understand from experience; ability to acquire and retain knowledge; mental ability.
Webster's New World
The ability to respond quickly and effectively to a new situation; use of the faculty of reason in solving problems, directing conduct, etc.
Webster's New World
Information, especially secret information gathered about an actual or potential enemy or adversary.
American Heritage
Measured success in using these abilities to perform certain tasks.
Webster's New World
News or information.
Webster's New World
Advertisement
other
According to Jeffery T. Richelson in his tome The U.S. Intelligence Community, “intelligence” is the product of an information search and analysis about some foreign nation or about that nation’s operation areas of particular interest. In the United States, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) collects overseas intelligence, whereas the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) collects domestic intelligence. Today, the collection of intelligence includes employing hacking skills to access information stored in computer systems around the world. Legally, the CIA cannot collect intelligence against a U.S. citizen unless the investigation began overseas. For these kinds of cases, the CIA communicates with and shares intelligence with the FBI. Milnet.com. MILNET: Intelligence Defined. [Online, November 4, 1997.] Milnet.com Website. http://www.milnet.com/definei.htm.
Webster's New World Hacker

Other Word Forms of Intelligence

Noun

Singular:
intelligence
Plural:
intelligences

Origin of Intelligence

  • From Old French intelligence, from Latin intelligentia.

    From Wiktionary

Advertisement

Find Similar Words

Find similar words to intelligence using the buttons below.

Words Starting With

Words Ending With

Unscrambles

intelligence