Moore-s-law definitions

mo͝orz, môrz
The prediction that the number of transistors that can be placed on an affordable integrated circuit will double during a specific time period, usually said to be every 18 months or every 2 years.
noun
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The observation that steady technological improvements in miniaturization leads to a doubling of the density of transistors on new integrated circuits every 18 months. In the mid-1960s, Gordon Moore (born 1929), one of the founders of Intel Corporation, observed that the density of transistors had been doubling every year, although the pace slowed slightly in the following years. The 18-month pattern held true into the 21st century, though as technology approaches the point where circuits are only a few atoms wide, new technologies, possibly not involving transistors at all, may be required for further miniaturization.
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A law that states that the number of chips on a transistor, and thus the transistor’s computing power, will double about every two or three years. The law also states that this increase in computing ability will not require an equivalent increase in cost. The law is named after Gordon Moore, a pioneer in the semiconductor industry, who articulated his theory in 1965. He was one of the founders of Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957, but left that firm with other colleagues to co-found Intel Corp. in 1968. To date, Moore’s law has held true.
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The observation of Gordon E. Moore (1929
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"The number of transistors and resistors on a chip doubles every 18 months," coined by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore regarding the pace of semiconductor technology. He said this in 1965 when there were approximately 60 devices on a chip. Proving Moore's law to be rather accurate, four decades later, Intel placed 1.7 billion transistors on its Itanium chip.In 1975, Moore extended the 18 months to 24 months. He also said the cost of a semiconductor manufacturing plant doubles with each generation of microprocessor.Reaching Another Law - That of PhysicsUsing current silicon manufacturing methods, we are reaching a limit to miniaturization. As of 2019, 5 nanometer chips are about as small as we invision without a dramatic change in design and materials (see process technology). See laws.
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In the late 1960s, Gordon Moore, one of the founders of Intel, said that computer power doubles roughly every 12 to 18 months. This statement—now known as Moore’s Law—has been amazingly accurate for more than four decades. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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Origin of moore-s-law

After Gordon Moore (born 1929), American entrepreneur and developer of microchips who first proposed the principle