Intellectual-property meaning

The definition of intellectual property is the creative product of the mind and its exclusive right to use by the developer may be legally protected.

An example of intellectual property is an invention.

An example of intellectual property is the music of a song.

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Any of various products of the intellect that have commercial value, including copyrighted property such as literary or artistic works, and ideational property, such as patents, business methods, and industrial processes.
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The set of rights protecting such works and property from unlawful infringement.
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Something produced by the mind, of which the ownership or right to use may be legally protected by a copyright, patent, trademark, etc.
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Intellectual property refers to the proprietary assets of an organization. In the computer field, hardware circuits, software and text are copyrightable. Depending on the situation, the algorithms used within hardware circuits and software may also be patentable, and brand names can be trademarked as long as they are not generic descriptions. However, intellectual property (IP) covers more than just copyrights, patents and trademarks; for example, customer databases, mailing lists, trade secrets and other business information are also included.
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The knowledge of how to develop products or processes. Typically intellectual property is protected by patents, trademarks, or copyrights.
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Property derived from the work of human intellect. Intellectual property laws cover a wide range of property created by artists, authors, inventors, and musician, and protect copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. See also copyright, patent, and trademark.
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(legal term) A legal concept that treats and protects the creative products of the human mind as carefully as the law would treat and protect one’s physical property, such as a home and the land that it sits on. In short, IP laws grant certain kinds of exclusive rights to the developers of creative products such as software, games, hardware, movies, books, songs, and so on. According to IP laws, the developers of creative products should have the first rights to the sale and/or distribution of these products, just as an owner of a property should have the first rights to the sale and/or distribution of his or her property. A number of cases have been publicized in recent years regarding infringements of IP, particularly around online song swapping and the denial of royalties to artists. An alleged crime against IP does not always have an artistic aspect, however. For example, on February 3, 2005, Andrew Mata, a government employee charged with cracking the Department of Social Services Website in 1999, was cleared by a jury of any wrongdoing. Though Mata was charged with illegally entering the computer system to upgrade his access privileges after he left the Department of Social Services for a job in the Department of Health and Hospitals—a crime, it was argued, against Intellectual Property—Mata said in his defense that he changed his access back to where he thought it should have been when he moved to the Department of Health and Hospitals, though he was supposed to have the same privilege status on both departments’ computer systems. The jury believed Mata. He walked away from a potential five-year jail term. Schell, B.H. and Martin, C. Contemporary World Issues Series: Cybercrime: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2004; The Associated Press. State Worker Acquitted of Hacking Government Computer. [Online, February 3, 2005.] Tuscaloosa News Website. http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/apps/pbcs/d11/article?AID=/20050203/APN/ 502030742.
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Any product of someone's intellect that has commercial value: copyrights, patents, trademarks and trade secrets.
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