Digital-millennium-copyright-act definition

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is defined as an extension of U.S. copyright laws and is an implementation of two 1996 treaties of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) which observe intellectual property laws, prevent the use of devices that allow duplication of copyrighted materials, and limit the liability of on-line service providers.
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The Act amended the U.S. Copyright Act to provide limitations for online service providers to avoid liability when infringing copyrights.
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People cannot find ways to go around the anti-piracy measures in the Act.
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The Act makes the manufacture, sale, and distribution illegal for code-cracking devices for illegally copied software.
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The cracking of copyright protection services is allowed by the Act, if it is being used for testing of computer security systems, assessing product interoperability, and conducting encryption research.
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Exemptions from anti-circumvention provisions for archives, non profit libraries, and educational institutions are available in some instances in the Act.
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The Act keeps service providers from having information on their website that are examples of copyright infringement.
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The Act mandates that webcasters must pay licensing fees to record companies whose music they are using.
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The liability of nonprofit institutions or higher education is limited by the Act.
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The Act spells out stipulations that the Register of Copyrights must follow.

An example of the DMCA is that all analog video recorders have built in support for a specific form of copy prevention created by Macrovision (now Rovi Corporation).

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