Waist meaning

wāst
The part of the body between the ribs and the hips.
noun
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3
The middle section or part of an object, especially when narrower than the rest.
noun
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2
(nautical) The middle part of the upper deck of a ship between the forecastle and the quarterdeck.
noun
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2
The narrow part of any object that is wider at the ends.

The waist of a violin.

noun
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2
(naut.) The central section of a ship between the forecastle and the quarterdeck.
noun
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3
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The waist is the part of the body between the ribs and hips, or the part of the clothes that cover this part of the body.

An example of the waist is where a belt is usually worn.

noun
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The part of the body between the pelvis and the stomach.
noun
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A part of a piece of clothing that covers the waist.
noun
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The narrow connection between the thorax and abdomen in certain insects (e.g., bees, ants and wasps).
noun
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The middle portion of the hull of a ship or the fuselage of an aircraft.
noun
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(nautical) That part of the upper deck of a ship between the quarterdeck and the forecastle.
noun
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(aeron.) The middle section of the fuselage of an airplane, esp. a bomber.
noun
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3
(zool.) The narrow part of the front of the abdomen of certain insects, as ants or wasps.
noun
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3
The part of the human trunk between the bottom of the rib cage and the pelvis.
noun
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3
The narrow part of the abdomen of an insect.
noun
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3
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
waist
Plural:
waists

Origin of waist

  • Middle English wast perhaps from Old English wæst growth, size aug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English waste, wast (“stature, waist"), from Old English *wÇ£st, *wÇ£xt, from Proto-Germanic *wahstuz (“growth, development, stature, build"), from Proto-Indo-European *hâ‚‚weg-s- (“to multiply, increase"). Cognate with Middle High German wahst (“growth"), Danish vækst (“growth"), Swedish växt (“growth, development, size"), Icelandic vöxtur (“growth"), Gothic [script?] (wahstus, “growth"). Related to Old English weaxan (“to grow, increase"). More at wax.

    From Wiktionary