Bluff Definition

blŭf
bluffer, bluffest, bluffing, bluffs
verb
bluffing, bluffs
To engage in a false display of confidence or aggression in order to deceive or intimidate someone.
The management debated if there would really be a strike or if the union was bluffing.
American Heritage
To frighten (a person) by threats not intended to be carried out.
Webster's New World
To make a display of aggression, as by charging or baring the teeth, as a means of intimidating another animal.
American Heritage
To mislead or seek to mislead (a person) by a false, bold front.
Webster's New World
To manage to get (one's way) by bluffing.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
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noun
bluffs
The act or practice of bluffing.
Webster's New World
A person who bluffs.
Webster's New World
A high, steep, broad-faced bank or cliff.
Webster's New World
The definition of bluff refers to the act of pretending something that is not true or a very steep, broad-faced cliff next to the ocean or a river.
An example of a bluff is when someone playing poker pretends he has a full house even when he doesn't have a good hand.
An example of a bluff is the steep-sided hills along the banks of the Missouri River in Council Bluffs Iowa.
YourDictionary
(poker) An attempt to represent yourself as holding a stronger hand than you do.
John's bet was a bluff: he bet without even so much as a pair.
Wiktionary
Synonyms:
Antonyms:
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adjective
bluffer, bluffest
Having, or ascending steeply with, a broad, flat front.
Webster's New World
Having a rough and frank but affable manner.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
pronoun
The southernmost town in the South Island of New Zealand, and seaport for the Southland region.
Wiktionary
idiom
bluff (one's) way
  • To deceive someone or accomplish something by making a false display.
American Heritage

Other Word Forms of Bluff

Noun

Singular:
bluff
Plural:
bluffs

Adjective

Base Form:
bluff
Comparative:
bluffer
Superlative:
bluffest

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Bluff

  • bluff (one's) way

Origin of Bluff

  • Probably from obsolete Dutch blaf or Middle Low German blaff broad

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Dutch bluffen (“brag”) or bluf (“bragging”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Related to Middle Low German blaff, "smooth".

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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