Magic meaning

măjĭk
Magic is defined as the art of using spells, charms and rituals to control supernational forces, or the art of performing tricks and illusions.

An example of magic is pulling a rabbit out of a previously empty hat.

noun
13
1
A mysterious quality of enchantment.
noun
13
2
The definition of magic is producing mysterious or extraordinary results.

An example of magic used as an adjective is in the phrase "magic potion" which means a potion that works in mysterious, unexplainable ways.

adjective
10
2
To produce, alter, or cause by or as if by magic.
verb
8
1
Of, relating to, or invoking the supernatural.
adjective
7
2
Advertisement
Possessing distinctive qualities that produce unaccountable or baffling effects.
adjective
2
0
The art or performing skill of producing baffling effects or illusions by sleight of hand, concealed apparatus, etc.
noun
2
0
Producing extraordinary results, as if by magic or supernatural means.
adjective
2
0
2
0
To cause to disappear by or as if by magic. Used with away .

His shoes had been magicked away in the night.

verb
1
0
Advertisement
Of, produced by, used in, or using magic.
adjective
1
0
To cause, change, make, etc. by or as if by magic.
verb
1
0
To make disappear by or as if by magic.
verb
1
0
The use of rituals or actions, especially based on supernatural or occult knowledge, to manipulate or obtain information about the natural world, especially when seen as falling outside the realm of religion; also the forces allegedly drawn on for such practices. [from 14th c.]
noun
1
0
The exercise of sleight of hand or conjuring, as in making something seem to disappear, for entertainment.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any mysterious, seemingly inexplicable, or extraordinary power or quality.

The magic of love.

noun
0
0
A specific ritual or procedure associated with supernatural magic or with mysticism; a spell. [from 14th c.]
noun
0
0
Something producing remarkable results, especially when not fully understood; an enchanting quality; exceptional skill. [from 17th c.]
noun
0
0
A conjuring trick or illusion performed to give the appearance of supernatural phenomena or powers. [from 19th c.]
noun
0
0
Having supernatural talents, properties or qualities attributed to magic. [from 14th c.]

A magic wand; a magic dragon.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Producing extraordinary results, as though through the use of magic; wonderful, amazing. [from 17th c.]

A magic moment.

adjective
0
0
Pertaining to conjuring tricks or illusions performed for entertainment etc. [from 19th c.]

A magic show; a magic trick.

adjective
0
0
(colloquial) Great; excellent. [from 20th c.]

"” I cleaned up the flat while you were out. "” Really? Magic!

adjective
0
0
(physics) Describing the number of nucleons in a particularly stable isotopic nucleus; 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126, and 184. [from 20th c.]
adjective
0
0
To produce, transform (something), (as if) by magic. [from 20th c.]
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The decrypted Japanese messages produced by US cryptographers in and prior to World War II.
pronoun
0
0

Origin of magic

  • Middle English magik from Old French magique from Late Latin magica from Latin magicē from Greek magikē from feminine of magikos of the Magi, magical from magos magician, magus magus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French magique (noun and adjective), from Latin magicus (adjective), magica (noun use of feminine form of magicus), from Ancient Greek μαγικός (magikos, “magical"), from μάγος (magos, “magus"). Displaced native Middle English dweomercraft (“magic, magic arts") (from Old English dwimor (“phantom, illusion") + cræft (“art")), Old English galdorcræft (“magic, enchantment"), Old English drȳcræft (“magic, sorcery").

    From Wiktionary