Fey meaning

(Chiefly Scottish) Possessing second sight, clairvoyance, or clairaudience.
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Overrefined, precious; quaint, cute.
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Strange or unusual in any of certain ways, as, variously, eccentric, whimsical, visionary, elfin, shy, otherworldly.
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Fairy folk collectively.
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The definition of fey is eccentric or strange.

An example of something fey is wearing a Halloween costume in the middle of the spring.

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(dialectal or archaic) About to die; fated; doomed; on the verge of sudden or violent death.
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Origin of fey

  • Middle English feie fated to die from Old English fǣge

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fey (“fated to die”), from Old English fǣge (“doomed to die, timid”), from Proto-Germanic *faigijaz (“cowardly, wicked”), from Proto-Indo-European *pAik-, *pAig- (“ill-meaning, bad”). Akin to Old Saxon fēgi whence Dutch veeg (“doomed, near death”), Old High German feigi (“appointed for death, ungodly”) whence German feige (“cowardly”), Old Norse feigr (“doomed”) whence the Icelandic feigur (“doomed to die”), Old English fāh (“outlawed, hostile”). More at foe.

    From Wiktionary