Laugh definition

lăf, läf
To produce sounds resembling laughter.

Parrots laughing and chattering in the trees.

verb
15
3
To feel or express derision or contempt; mock.

I had to laugh when I saw who my opponent was.

verb
9
4
To make the explosive sounds of the voice, and the characteristic movements of the features and body, that express mirth, amusement, ridicule, etc.
verb
5
1
Laugh is defined as to express amusement with vocal sounds and facial movements.

An example of laugh is someone making sounds to show they think something is funny.

verb
3
2
(informal) Fun; amusement.

Went along just for laughs.

noun
1
1
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To feel a triumphant or exultant sense of well-being.

You won't be laughing when the truth comes out.

verb
1
2
To affect or influence by laughter.

Laughed the speaker off the stage; laughed the proposal down.

verb
0
1
To bring about, effect, or cause to be by means of laughter.

To laugh oneself hoarse.

verb
0
1
The act or sound of laughing.
noun
0
1
Anything that provokes or is fit to provoke laughter.
noun
0
1
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(informal) Mere diversion or pleasure.
noun
0
1
An expression of mirth particular to the human species; the sound heard in laughing; laughter.

Why would you laugh about that when it's not even funny? You have a twisted sense of humour.

noun
0
1
Something that provokes mirth or scorn.
noun
0
1
(UK) A fun person.
noun
0
1
(intransitive) To show mirth, satisfaction, or derision, by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face, particularly of the mouth, causing a lighting up of the face and eyes, and usually accompanied by the emission of explosive or chuckling sounds from the chest and throat; to indulge in laughter.
verb
0
1
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1734, Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man, Chapter 3

In Folly's cup Å¿till laughs the bubble Joy.

verb
0
1
(intransitive, followed by "at") To make an object of laughter or ridicule; to make fun of; to deride; to mock.
verb
0
1
To affect or influence by means of laughter or ridicule.
verb
0
1
To express by, or utter with, laughter.
verb
0
1
To express certain emotions, especially mirth or delight, by a series of spontaneous, usually unarticulated sounds often accompanied by corresponding facial and bodily movements.
verb
0
2
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To show or feel amusement or good humor.

An experience we would laugh about later on.

verb
0
2
To say with a laugh.

He laughed his delight at the victory.

verb
0
2
(informal) Something amusing, absurd, or contemptible; a joke.

The solution they recommended was a laugh.

noun
0
2
The act of laughing.
noun
0
2
The sound of laughing; laughter.
noun
0
2
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To be amused.
verb
0
2
To feel or suggest joyousness; appear bright and merry.

Laughing eyes.

verb
0
2
To express or say with laughter.
verb
0
2
laugh all the way to the bank
  • To take glee in making money, especially from activity that others consider to be unimpressive or unlikely to turn a profit.
idiom
0
1
laugh out of the other side of (one's) mouth
  • To see one's good fortune turn to bad; suffer a humbling reversal.
idiom
0
1
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laugh up
  • To rejoice or exult in secret, as at another's error or defeat.
idiom
0
1
have the last laugh
  • to win or prevail ultimately, after apparent defeat and discomfiture
idiom
0
1
laugh at
  • to be amused by
  • to make fun of; ridicule; deride
  • to be indifferent to or contemptuous of; disregard
idiom
0
1
laugh away
  • to get rid of (something unpleasant or embarrassing) by laughter
idiom
0
1
laugh down
  • to silence or suppress by laughing
idiom
0
1
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laugh up one's sleeve
  • to laugh secretly or inwardly
idiom
0
1
laugh off
  • to reject or dismiss from consideration as by laughter or ridicule
idiom
0
1
laugh on the other side of one's face
  • to undergo a change in mood from joy to sorrow, from amusement to annoyance, etc.
idiom
0
1
no laughing matter
  • a serious matter
idiom
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
laugh
Plural:
laughs

Origin of laugh

  • Middle English laughen from Old English hlæhhan probably ultimately of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English laughen, laghen, from Old English hlehhan, hlæhan, hlihhan, hliehhan (“to laugh, laugh at, deride, rejoice "), from Proto-Germanic *hlahjanÄ… (“to laugh"), from Proto-Indo-European *klek-, *kleg- (“to shout"). Cognate with Scots lauch (“to laugh"), West Frisian laitsje (“to laugh"), Dutch lachen (“to laugh, smile"), German lachen (“to laugh"), Danish le (“to laugh"), Icelandic hlæja (“to laugh"), Albanian qesh (“to laugh") < arc. klêsh, Latin glōcÄ«re (“to cluck"), Latin glattÄ«re (“to yelp"), Latin gliccÄ«re (“to gaggle"), Welsh cloch (“bell"), Ancient Greek κλώσσω (klṓssô, “to cluck"), Old Church Slavonic клєкотъ (klekotÅ­, “laughter, noise"), Latin clangō (“scream, sound"). Related to clang.

    From Wiktionary