Smack Definition

smăk
smacked, smacking, smacks
verb
smacked, smacking, smacks
To have a distinctive flavor or taste. Used with of.
American Heritage
To press (the lips) together and part them suddenly so as to make a smack.
Webster's New World
To kiss loudly.
Webster's New World
To give an indication; be suggestive. Often used with of:
American Heritage
To make a loud, sharp noise, as on impact.
Webster's New World
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noun
smacks
A distinctive taste or flavor, esp. one that is faint or slight.
Webster's New World
A noisy kiss.
American Heritage
The sound of such a blow.
Webster's New World
A small amount; bit.
Webster's New World
A touch, trace, or suggestion.
Webster's New World
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adverb
With or as with a smack; violently; sharply.
Webster's New World
Directly; precisely; squarely.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
idiom
smack down
  • to humble or reprimand (someone who is overstepping bounds)
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Smack

Noun

Singular:
smack
Plural:
smacks

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Smack

Origin of Smack

  • From Middle English smac, smak, smacke, from Old English smæċ (“taste, smatch"), from Proto-Germanic *smakkuz (“a taste"), from Proto-Indo-European *smegÊ°-, *smeg- (“to taste"). Cognate with English dialectal smatch, Scots smak (“scent, smell, taste, flavour"), Saterland Frisian Smoak (“taste"), West Frisian smaak (“taste"), Dutch smaak (“taste"), German Schmack, Geschmack (“taste"), Swedish smak (“taste"). Akin to Old English smæccan (“to taste, smack"). More at smake, smatch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From or akin to Dutch smakken (“to fling down"), Plautdietsch schmaksen (“to smack the lips"), regional German schmacken (compare Swedish smak (“slap"), Middle Low German smacken, the first part of Saterland Frisian smakmuulje (“smack")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably variant of smeck from Yiddish shmek a sniff, swell from shmekn to sniff, smell from Middle High German smecken, smacken to smell, taste from Old High German smac smell, taste

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle Low German smack (Low German Schmacke, Schmaake (“small ship")) or Dutch smak.

    From Wiktionary

  • Dutch or Low German smak from smakken to fling, dash

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Middle Flemish origin or perhaps of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English smæc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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