Smack meaning

smăk
Smack means the sound made by lips in kissing or enjoying food.

An example of a smack is a loud kiss.

An example of a smack is the sound made when tasting food.

noun
3
0
Smack is defined as a hit with a hand or another flat object.

An example of a smack is hitting someone on the bottom.

noun
1
0
The definition of a smack is a small amount.

An example of a smack is a hint of cinnamon in a soup.

noun
1
0
A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a fishing smack.
noun
1
0
Smack is slang for heroin.

An example of smack is what you’d ask for when buying heroin on the street.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To smack is to hit.

An example of to smack is hit someone on the back with your hand.

verb
0
0
To press together and open (the lips) quickly and noisily, as in eating or tasting.
verb
0
0
To kiss noisily.
verb
0
0
To strike sharply and with a loud noise.
verb
0
0
To make or give a smack.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To collide sharply and noisily.

The ball smacked against the side of the house.

verb
0
0
The loud sharp sound of smacking.
noun
0
0
A noisy kiss.
noun
0
0
A sharp blow or slap.
noun
0
0
With a smack.

Fell smack on her head.

adverb
0
0
Advertisement
Directly.
adverb
0
0
A small amount; a smattering.
noun
0
0
To give an indication; be suggestive. Often used with of:
verb
0
0
A fishing boat sailing under various rigs, according to size, and often having a well used to transport the catch to market.
noun
0
0
Heroin.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A distinctive taste or flavor, esp. one that is faint or slight.
noun
0
0
To have a smack (of)

Diction that smacks of the stage.

verb
0
0
A sharp noise made by pressing the lips together and parting them suddenly, as in showing enjoyment of a taste.
noun
0
0
A loud kiss.
noun
0
0
To press (the lips) together and part them suddenly so as to make a smack.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To kiss loudly.
verb
0
0
To slap loudly.
verb
0
0
To collide with or strike suddenly and forcefully.
verb
0
0
To make a loud, sharp noise, as on impact.
verb
0
0
To collide or strike suddenly and forcefully.

Two cars smacked against each other.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
With or as with a smack; violently; sharply.
adverb
0
0
Directly; precisely; squarely.
adverb
0
0
A small sailboat, typically rigged as a sloop.
noun
0
0
A fishing boat with a well for keeping fish alive.
noun
0
0
Heroin.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Heroin.
noun
0
0
A distinct flavor.
noun
0
0
A slight trace of something; a smattering.
noun
0
0
(slang) Heroin.
noun
0
0
To indicate or suggest something.

Her reckless behavior smacks of pride.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To have a particular taste.
verb
0
0
A sharp blow; a slap. See also: spank.
noun
0
0
A loud kiss.
noun
0
0
A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
noun
0
0
To slap someone, or to make a smacking sound.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, after tasting something or in expectation of a treat.
verb
0
0
To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate.
verb
0
0
As if with a smack or slap.

Right smack bang in the middle.

adverb
0
0
To have a distinctive flavor or taste. Used with of.
verb
0
1
smack down
  • To humble or reprimand (someone who is overstepping bounds).
idiom
0
0
Advertisement

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of smack

  • Probably variant of smeck from Yiddish shmek a sniff, swell from shmekn to sniff, smell from Middle High German smecken, smacken to smell, taste from Old High German smac smell, taste

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Dutch or Low German smak from smakken to fling, dash

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Middle Flemish origin or perhaps of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English smæc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English smac, smak, smacke, from Old English smæċ (“taste, smatch"), from Proto-Germanic *smakkuz (“a taste"), from Proto-Indo-European *smegÊ°-, *smeg- (“to taste"). Cognate with English dialectal smatch, Scots smak (“scent, smell, taste, flavour"), Saterland Frisian Smoak (“taste"), West Frisian smaak (“taste"), Dutch smaak (“taste"), German Schmack, Geschmack (“taste"), Swedish smak (“taste"). Akin to Old English smæccan (“to taste, smack"). More at smake, smatch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From or akin to Dutch smakken (“to fling down"), Plautdietsch schmaksen (“to smack the lips"), regional German schmacken (compare Swedish smak (“slap"), Middle Low German smacken, the first part of Saterland Frisian smakmuulje (“smack")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle Low German smack (Low German Schmacke, Schmaake (“small ship")) or Dutch smak.

    From Wiktionary