Cleat meaning

klēt
Frequency:
The definition of a cleat is a shoe with metal, rubber or other material projecting from the sole that helps you to get a better grip, or the metal, rubber or other pieces that project from the bottom of the shoe.

Shoes with little metal pieces on the bottom to help you get a grip when playing football are an example of cleats.

The little metal pieces on the bottom of your football shoes are an example of cleats.

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A small metal or wood fitting, specif. one with projecting ends, fixed as to the deck of a ship and used to secure a rope.
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A strip of wood or iron used to strengthen or support the surface to which it is attached.
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A piece of metal or wood having projecting arms or ends on which a rope can be wound or secured.
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A wedge-shaped piece of material, such as wood, that is fastened onto something, such as a spar, to act as a support or prevent slippage.
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A spurlike device used in gripping a tree or pole in climbing.
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To supply, support, secure, or strengthen with a cleat.
verb
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A piece of wood, metal, or plastic, often wedge-shaped, fastened to something to strengthen it or give secure footing: cleats are used on gangways, under shelves, on the soles or heels of shoes, etc.
noun
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To fasten to or with a cleat.
verb
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A strip of wood or iron fastened on transversely to something in order to give strength, prevent warping, hold position, etc.
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A continuous metal strip, or angled piece, used to secure metal components.
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(nautical) A device to quickly affix a line or rope, and from which it is also easy to release.
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A protrusion on the bottom of a shoe meant for better traction. (See cleats.)
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To strengthen with a cleat.
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(nautical) To tie off, affix, stopper a line or rope, especially to a cleat.
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Origin of cleat

  • Middle English clete from Old English clēat lump, wedge

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English clete, from Old English clēat, from Proto-Germanic *klautaz (“firm lump”), from Proto-Indo-European *glei- (“to glue, stick together, form into a ball”). Cognate with Dutch kloot (“ball; testicle”) and German Kloß. See also clay and clout.

    From Wiktionary