Batten definition

bătn
To batten is to grow fat by eating continuously.

To eat large meals every day and gain weigh is an example of to batten.

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The definition of batten means to become well fed or wealthy at the expense of other people.

To steal from poor people in order to live a life of luxury is an example of to batten.

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To become fat.
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To thrive and prosper, especially at another's expense.
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A narrow strip of wood used in construction, especially to cover a seam between boards, as flooring material, or as a lath.
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One of several flexible strips of wood or plastic placed in pockets at the outer edge of a sail to keep it flat.
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A narrow strip of wood used to fasten down the edges of the material that covers hatches in foul weather.
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The heavy swinging bar on a loom that holds the reed and is pulled forward to pack down the weft.
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A flat stick used in weaving by hand to separate the upper and lower threads of the warp and to tighten the weft.
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(nautical) To furnish, fasten, or secure with battens.

Battened down the hatch during the storm.

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A sawed strip of wood, flooring, etc.
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A strip of wood put over a seam between boards as a fastening or covering.
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A short piece of wood or plastic inserted in a sail to keep it taut.
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A strip of steel or wood used to fasten canvas over a ship's hatchways.
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To fasten with battens.
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To supply or strengthen with battens.
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To grow fat; thrive.
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To be well fed or wealthy at another's expense.
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To fatten up; overfeed.
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In a loom, the movable frame that presses into place the threads of a woof.
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(intransitive) To become better; improve in condition, especially by feeding.
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(intransitive) To feed on; to revel in.
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(intransitive) To thrive by feeding; grow fat; feed oneself gluttonously.
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(intransitive) To thrive, prosper, or live in luxury, especially at the expense of others; fare sumptuously.

Robber barons who battened on the poor.

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(intransitive) To gratify a morbid appetite or craving; gloat.
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To improve by feeding; fatten; make fat or cause to thrive due to plenteous feeding.
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To fertilize or enrich, as land.
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A thin strip of wood used in construction to hold members of a structure together or to provide a fixing point.
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(nautical) A long strip of wood, metal, fibreglass etc used for various purposes aboard ship, especially one inserted in a pocket sewn on the sail in order to keep the sail flat.
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In stagecraft, a long pipe, usually metal, affixed to the ceiling or fly system in a theater.
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The movable bar of a loom, which strikes home or closes the threads of a woof.
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To furnish with battens.
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(nautical) To fasten or secure a hatch etc using battens.
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To fatten; overfeed.
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batten down the hatches
  • To prepare for an imminent disaster or emergency.
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batten down the hatches
  • to fasten canvas over the hatches, esp. in preparing for a storm
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of batten - batton

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
batten
Plural:
battens

Origin of batten

  • Alteration of Middle English batent finished board or bar of wood from Old French batant wooden strip, clapper from present participle of batre to beat batter1 Noun, sense 3a and b, from French batant from Old French

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Ultimately from Old Norse batna to improve bhad- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English *battenen, *batnen, of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse batna (“to grow better, improve, recover”), from Proto-Germanic *batnaną (“to become good, get better”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhAd- (“good”). Cognate with Icelandic batna (“to improve, recover”), Gothic (gabatnan, “to be noteful, profit, boot”), Dutch baten (“to avail, profit, benefit”), Old English batian (“to get better, recover”). More at better.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bataunt, batent (“finished board”), from Old French batent (“beating”)

    From Wiktionary