Totter definition

tŏtər
To walk unsteadily or feebly; stagger.
verb
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To sway as if about to fall.
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To appear about to collapse.

An empire that had begun to totter.

verb
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To proceed with feeble, unsure steps.
verb
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To rock or shake as if about to fall; be unsteady.
verb
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To be on the point of failure or collapse.
verb
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An unsteady walk or movement.
noun
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noun
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(archaic) A rag and bone man.
noun
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To walk,move or stand unsteadily or falteringly; threatening to fall.

The baby tottered from the table to the chair.

The old man tottered out of the pub into the street.

The car tottered on the edge of the cliff.

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(archaic, intransitive) To collect junk or scrap.
verb
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The act or condition of tottering.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
totter
Plural:
totters

Origin of totter

  • Middle English toteren perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English totren, toteren, from earlier *tolteren (compare English dialectal tolter (“to struggle, flounder"); Scots tolter (“unstable, wonky")), from Old English tealtrian (“to totter, vacillate"), from Proto-Germanic *taltrōnÄ…, *taltōnÄ… (“to sway, dangle, hesitate"), from Proto-Indo-European *del-, *dul- (“to shake, hesitate"). Cognate with Dutch touteren (“to tremble"), North Frisian talt, tolt (“unstable, shaky"). Related to tilt.

    From Wiktionary