Notice meaning

nō'tĭs
To perceive with the mind; detect.

Noticed several discrepancies.

verb
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Respectful attention or consideration.

Grateful for the teacher's notice.

noun
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A written or printed sign giving some public information, warning, or rule.
noun
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The act of noting or observing; perception or attention.

That detail escaped my notice.

noun
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Information, announcement, or warning; esp., formal announcement or warning, as in a newspaper.

A legal notice.

noun
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A state of awareness of a fact or thing, as required by law or contract.
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Notice is something that gets attention or an official warning announcement or the practice of formally quitting a job.

An example of notice is when your attitude attracts attention.

An example of notice is a bulletin sent out about a new product.

An example of notice is when you tell your boss you are leaving your job in two weeks.

noun
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A written or printed announcement.

A notice of sale.

noun
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To notice is to learn about or see something for the first time, or giving someone or something attention.

An example of notice is when you see someone got a new haircut.

An example of notice is when an author has his book reviewed in the newspaper.

verb
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A printed critical review, as of a play or book.
noun
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To take notice of; observe.

Noticed a figure in the doorway.

verb
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A brief mention or critical review of a work of art, book, play, etc.
noun
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A formal announcement or warning of intention to end an agreement, relation, or contract at a certain time.

To give a tenant notice.

noun
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A communication seeking to make its recipient aware of a fact or thing, as required by law or contract.
noun
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Notice personally received by the person for whom it was intended.
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Notice deemed to have been received by a party, due to publicly known facts or events of which that party had a duty to be aware.
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Notice deemed to have been received by a party, due to his or her knowledge of other information that should have led that party to become aware of the matter in question.
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Notice deemed to have been received by a party, due to the party’s knowledge of other information that would have caused a reasonable person to inquire further.
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Notice taken by a court that a fact is so obvious, well-known or commonly accepted that no proof is required to establish that fact; for example, judicial notice may be taken of the fact that many people died during the events of September 11, 2001, without proof being necessary as to the actual death of such persons.
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Actual notice received directly by the person for whom it was intended.
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(chiefly uncountable) The act of observing; perception.

He took no notice of the changes, and went on as though nothing had happened.

noun
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(countable) A written or printed announcement.

Shall we post a notice about the new policy?

I always read the death notices in the paper.

noun
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(countable) A formal notification or warning.
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(chiefly uncountable) Advance notification of termination of employment, given by an employer to an employee or vice versa.

I gave her her mandatory two weeks' notice and sacked her.

I can't work here any longer. I'm giving notice.

noun
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(countable) A published critical review of a play or the like.
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(uncountable) Prior notification.

I don't mind if you want to change the venue; just give me some notice first, OK?

noun
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(dated) Attention; respectful treatment; civility.
noun
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To observe or take notice of.

Did you notice the flowers in her yard?

verb
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To detect; to perceive with the mind.

I noticed that the dog hadn't barked the night of the murder.

verb
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serve notice
  • To give formal warning or information, as of intentions; announce.
idiom
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take notice
  • To become aware; pay attention; observe.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of notice

  • Middle English knowledge from Old French from Latin nōtitia from nōtus known past participle of nōscere to get to know gnō- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin notitia.
    From Wiktionary