Anchor definition

ăngkər
A source of security or stability.
noun
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4
To be or become fixed.
verb
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4
A rigid point of support, as for securing a rope.
noun
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1
To keep from drifting, giving way, etc., by or as by an anchor.
verb
6
3
(nautical) A heavy object attached to a vessel by a cable, rope, or chain and dropped into the water to keep the vessel in place either by its weight or by its flukes, which grip the bottom.
noun
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A heavy object, usually a shaped iron weight with flukes, lowered by cable or chain to the bottom of a body of water to keep a vessel from drifting.
noun
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1
A person who anchors a team, newscast, etc.
noun
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0
(sports) To serve as an anchor for (a team or competition).

Anchor a relay race.

verb
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To narrate or coordinate (a newscast).
verb
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To cause to be fixed in place; fix or immobilize.

Fear anchoring him in the dark hallway; mussels anchoring themselves to a rock.

verb
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Anchor is defined as to fix or fasten.

An example of anchor is to secure a boat to the dock with rope.

verb
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The definition of an anchor is a weight dropped into the water to stop the movement of a boat or other floating object.

A heavy weight connected to a ship by a chain is an example of a type of anchor.

noun
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An anchorperson.
noun
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An athlete, usually the strongest member of a team, who performs the last stage of a relay race or other competition.
noun
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The person at the end of a tug-of-war team.
noun
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To provide or form an anchor store for.

Two major stores anchor each end of the shopping mall.

verb
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To secure (a vessel) with an anchor.
verb
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To secure with a fastener or similar device.

Bolts anchoring the deck to the house.

verb
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To cause to feel attached or secure.

Memories anchoring us to our home town.

verb
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To provide a basis for; establish or found.
verb
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(nautical) To drop anchor or lie at anchor.
verb
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Any device that holds something else secure.
noun
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Anything that gives or seems to give stability or security.
noun
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A major retail store, corporate headquarters, etc. that stabilizes or stimulates the economic activity of the shopping center, office building, etc. where it is located.
noun
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Designating the final leg, or stage, of a relay race.
adjective
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To serve as the end person for (a tug-of-war team)
verb
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To serve as coordinator of the various reports and as chief reporter for (a newscast)
verb
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To serve as an anchor for (a shopping center, etc.)
verb
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To lower the anchor overboard so as to keep from drifting.
verb
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A term used by Federal Reserve Governor Edward M. Gramlich in January 2003 to say that U.S. monetary policy needed an anchor, or a long-term strategy. He said that a clear strategy would help the Federal Reserve react to economic problems such as a surge in unemployment without riling financial markets.
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(nautical) A tool used to moor a vessel to the bottom of a sea or river to resist movement.
  • Formerly a vessel would differentiate amongst the anchors carried as waist anchor, best bower, bower, stream and kedge anchors, depending on purpose and, to a great extent, on mass and size of the anchor. Modern usage is storm anchor for the heaviest anchor with the longest rode, best bower or simply bower for the most commonly used anchor deployed from the bow, and stream or lunch hook for a small, light anchor used for temporary moorage and often deployed from the stern.
  • (nautical) An iron device so shaped as to grip the bottom and hold a vessel at her berth by the chain or rope attached. (FM 55-501).
noun
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(nautical) The combined anchoring gear (anchor, rode, and fittings such as bitts, cat, and windlass.)
noun
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Any instrument serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, such as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a device to hold the end of a bridge cable etc.; or a device used in metalworking to hold the core of a mould in place.
noun
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(Internet) A marked point in a document that can be the target of a hyperlink.
noun
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(television) An anchorman or anchorwoman.
noun
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(athletics) The final runner in a relay race.
noun
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(economics) A superstore or other facility that serves as a focus to bring customers into an area.
noun
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(figuratively) That which gives stability or security.
noun
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(architecture) A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together.
noun
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(architecture) Carved work, somewhat resembling an anchor or arrowhead; part of the ornaments of certain mouldings. It is seen in the echinus, or egg-and-anchor (called also egg-and-dart, egg-and-tongue) ornament.
noun
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One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges.
noun
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One of the calcareous spinules of certain holothurians, as in species of Synapta.
noun
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To hold an object, especially a ship or a boat to a fixed point.
verb
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To cast anchor; to come to anchor.

Our ship (the captain) anchored in the stream.

verb
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To stop; to fix or rest.
verb
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To provide emotional stability for a person in distress.
verb
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To perform as an anchorman.
verb
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To serve as the final contestant for (a relay team, bowling team, etc.)
verb
0
1
at anchor
  • anchored
idiom
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drop anchor
  • to lower the anchor overboard
  • to stay or settle (in a place)
idiom
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drag anchor
  • to drift because of the failure of the anchor to hold
  • to lose ground; slip or fail
idiom
1
0
ride at anchor
  • to be anchored
idiom
1
0
weigh anchor
  • to hoist a ship's anchor off the bottom preparatory to sailing
  • to leave; go away
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
anchor
Plural:
anchors

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

drag anchor
ride at anchor

Origin of anchor

  • Middle English anker, ancher from Old English ancor from Latin ancora, anchora from Greek ankura

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English anker, Old English ancor, from Latin ancora, from (cognate with) Ancient Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura), from Proto-Indo-European *ang- (“corner, hirn”). The modern spelling is a sixteenth-century modification to better represent the Latin misspelling anchora.

    From Wiktionary