Heath definition

hēth
Designating a family (Ericaceae, order Ericales) of dicotyledonous woody shrubs and small trees, including the blueberry, mountain laurel, and rhododendrons.
adjective
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The definition of a heath is a wasteland, or a plant in the genera Erica or Calluna, or a former British Prime Minister.

An example of a heath is a dirty and open outdoor area.

An example of a heath is the heather plant.

An example of Heath was Britain's Prime Minister Edward Heath from 1970 to 1974.

noun
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Any small evergreen shrub of the genus Erica.
noun
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Heath is defined as part of the family Ericaceae of plants.

An example of something heath is a blueberry shrub.

adjective
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Any of various usually low-growing shrubs of the genus Erica and other genera of the heath family, native to Europe and South Africa and having small evergreen leaves and small, colorful, urn-shaped flowers.
noun
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An extensive tract of uncultivated open land covered with herbage and low shrubs; a moor.
noun
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A tract of open wasteland, esp. in the British Isles, covered with heather, low shrubs, etc.; moor.
noun
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Any plant of the heath family; esp., any of various shrubs and plants (genera Erica and Calluna) that grow on heaths, as heather.
noun
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(person) 1916-2005; Eng. politician: prime minister (1970-74)
proper name
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one's native heath
  • the place of one's birth or childhood
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
heath
Plural:
heaths

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

one's native heath

Origin of heath

  • Middle English uncultivated land from Old English hǣth kaito- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English heeth, hethe, heth, from Old English hǣþ (“heath, untilled land, waste; heather”), from Proto-Germanic *haiþī (“heath, waste, untilled land”), from Proto-Indo-European *kait-, *ḱait- (“forest, wasteland, pasture”). Cognate with Dutch heide (“heath, moorland”), German Heide (“heath, moor”), Swedish hed (“heath, moorland”), Old Welsh coit (“forest”), Latin bū-cētum (“pastureland”, literally “cow-pasture”), Albanian kath (“type of wheat”), kasht (“straw”).

    From Wiktionary