Beck meaning

bĕk
A gesture of beckoning or summons.
noun
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A small brook; a creek.
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A gesture of the hand, head, etc., meant to summon.
noun
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To summon by a beck; beckon.
verb
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A little stream, esp. one with a rocky bottom.
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(Norfolk, Northern England) A stream or small river.
noun
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A significant nod, or motion of the head or hand, especially as a call or command.

To be at the beck and call of someone.

noun
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(archaic) To nod or motion with the head.
verb
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A vat.
noun
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Obsolete form of beak.

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A surname​.
pronoun
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at (someone's) beck and call
  • Ready to comply with any wish or command.
idiom
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at the beck and call of
  • At the service of; obedient to the wishes of.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

at (someone's) beck and call
at the beck and call of

Origin of beck

  • Middle English bek from bekken to beckon alteration of bekenen beckon
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old Norse bekkr bhegw- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • A shortened form of beckon, from Old English bēcnan, from Proto-Germanic *baukną (“beacon”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old Norse bekkr (“a stream or brook”). Cognate with German Bach. More at beach.
    From Wiktionary
  • See back.
    From Wiktionary