Chamber meaning

chāmbər
Frequency:
The definition of chamber is an enclosed room or space, especially one in a legislative building, or the group that meets for a particular purpose or within a particular space.

A room off of the main courtroom where the judge has his private desk is an example of a chamber.

A group of people working on commerce activities is an example of a chamber of commerce.

noun
6
2
A room where a person of authority, rank, or importance receives visitors.
noun
3
0
An enclosed space.

The chamber of a canal lock; the chamber of a furnace; the chamber of the eye.

A test chamber is typically a closable case where devices under test are placed.

noun
2
1
A room in a house, especially a bedroom.
noun
1
0
The private office where the judge consults with parties and conducts business not required to be brought in open court.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A suite of rooms, especially one used by lawyers.
noun
0
0
A hall for the meetings of a legislative or other assembly.
noun
0
0
A legislative or judicial body.
noun
0
0
A board or council.
noun
0
0
A place where municipal or state funds are received and held; a treasury.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To put (a round) in the chamber of a firearm.
verb
0
0
To design or manufacture (a firearm) to hold a specific type of cartridge.
verb
0
0
To furnish with a chamber or chambers.

Tombs that were chambered.

verb
0
0
A suite of rooms used by one person.
noun
0
0
A judge's office located near the courtroom.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
An assembly hall.
noun
0
0
A legislative or judicial body or division.

The Chamber of Deputies.

noun
0
0
A council or board.

A chamber of commerce.

noun
0
0
An enclosed space in the body of a plant or animal.
noun
0
0
Any enclosed space; compartment; specif., the part of a gun that holds the charge, or any of the compartments for cartridges in the cylinder of a revolver.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To provide a chamber or chambers for.
verb
0
0
To put (a cartridge, etc.) into a chamber.
verb
0
0
Of, for, or performing chamber music.
adjective
0
0
An enclosed space or compartment.

The chamber of a pump; a compression chamber.

noun
0
0
An enclosed space in the body of an organism; a cavity.

The four chambers of the heart.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A room, especially one used primarily for sleeping; bedroom, sleeping room.
noun
0
0
(firearms) The portion of the weapon that holds the ammunition round immediately prior to (during initiation of) its discharge.

Dianne loaded a cartridge into the chamber of the rifle, then prepared to take aim at the target.

noun
0
0
One of the legislative bodies in a government where multiple such bodies exist, or a single such body in comparison to others.

The resolution, which speedily passed the Senate, was unable to gain a majority in the lower chamber.

noun
0
0
A law office in a building housing several such offices, typically the office of a barrister in the United Kingdom or in the imagination of an African scammer.
noun
0
0
(dated, in the plural) Apartments in a lodging house.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(historical) A short piece of ordnance or cannon which stood on its breech without any carriage, formerly used chiefly for celebrations and theatrical cannonades.
noun
0
0
To enclose in a room.

She had chambered herself in her room, and wouldn't come out.

verb
0
0
To reside in or occupy a chamber or chambers.
verb
0
0
To place in a chamber, as a round of ammunition.

The hunter fired at the geese and missed, then shrugged his shoulders and chambered another cartridge.

verb
0
0
To create or modify a gun to be a specific caliber.

The rifle was originally chambered for 9MM, but had since been modified for a larger, wildcat caliber.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
In martial arts, to prepare an offensive, defensive, or counteroffensive action by drawing a limb or weapon to a position where it may be charged with kinetic energy.

Bob chambered his fist for a blow, but Sheila struck first.

verb
0
0

Origin of chamber

  • Middle English chaumbre from Old French chambre from Late Latin camera chamber from Latin vault from Greek kamarā

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French chambre, from Latin camera, from Ancient Greek καμάρα (kamara, “vaulted chamber”).

    From Wiktionary