Space meaning

spās
The definition of a space is an empty, blank or available area.

An example of space is an empty parking place.

An example of space is the blank spot between two words written on paper.

noun
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One of the blank pieces of type or other means used for separating words or characters.
noun
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Blank sections in printed material or broadcast time available for use by advertisers.
noun
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To separate or keep apart.

The buildings are spaced far from each other.

verb
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A mathematical object, typically a set of sets, that is usually structured to define a range across which variables or other objects (such as a coordinate system) can be defined.
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Space is the three-dimensional area around you, including the universe.

An example of space is where stars and planets exist.

An example of space is where Ham the Chimp travelled for 16 minutes and 39 seconds in 1961 during the first space flight in one of the Project Mercury capsules named MR-2.

noun
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To organize or arrange with spaces between.

Carefully space the words on the poster.

verb
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To be or become stupefied or disoriented. Often used with out .

I was supposed to meet her, but I spaced out and forgot.

verb
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Room in a newspaper or magazine, or time on radio or TV, available for use by advertisers.
noun
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A set of points or elements assumed to satisfy a given set of postulates (Ex.: space of one dimension is a line and of two dimensions is a plane)
noun
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A particular area, extent, or cavity of the body.
noun
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Unlimited or generalized physical extent.
  • Distance between things. [from 14th c.].
  • Physical extent across two or three dimensions; area, volume (sometimes for or to do something). [from 14th c.].
  • Physical extent in all directions, seen as an attribute of the universe (now usually considered as a part of space-time), or a mathematical model of this. [from 17th c.].
  • The near-vacuum in which planets, stars and other celestial objects are situated; the universe beyond the earth's atmosphere. [from 17th c.].
  • The physical and psychological area one needs within which to live or operate; personal freedom. [from 20th c.].
noun
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A bounded or specific physical extent.
  • A (chiefly empty) area or volume with set limits or boundaries. [from 14th c.].
  • (music) A position on the staff or stave bounded by lines. [from 15th c.].
  • A gap in text between words, lines etc., or a digital character used to create such a gap. [from 16th c.].
  • (letterpress typography) A piece of metal type used to separate words, cast lower than other type so as not to take ink, especially one that is narrower than one en (compare quad). [from 17th c.].
  • A gap; an empty place. [from 17th c.].
  • (countable, mathematics) A generalized construct or set, the members of which have certain properties in common; often used in combination with the name of a particular mathematician. [from 20th c.].
    Functional analysis is best approached through a sound knowledge of Hilbert space theory.
  • (geometry) A set of points, each of which is uniquely specified by a number (the dimensionality) of coordinates.
  • (countable, figuratively) A marketplace for goods or services.
    Innovation in the browser space.
noun
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To set some distance apart.

Faye had spaced the pots at 8-inch intervals on the windowsill.The cities are evenly spaced.

verb
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To insert or utilise spaces in a written text.

This paragraph seems badly spaced.

verb
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To eject into outer space, usually without a space suit.

The captain spaced the traitors.

verb
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Independence, privacy, and freedom to follow one's own interests.
noun
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The open area between any two lines of a staff.
noun
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An interval when the key is open, or not in contact, during the sending of a message.
noun
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Of or pertaining to space, esp. to outer space.
adjective
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To arrange with space or spaces between; divide into or by spaces.
verb
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The region of the universe beyond Earth's atmosphere. &diamf3; The part of this region within the solar system is known as interplanetary space . &diamf3; The part of this region beyond the solar system but within the Milky Way or within another galaxy is known as interstellar space . &diamf3; The part of this region between the Milky Way and other galaxies is known as intergalactic space .
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The familiar three-dimensional region or field of everyday experience.
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(1) In digital electronics, a 0 bit. Contrast with mark.
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Of time.
  • (now rare, archaic) Free time; leisure, opportunity. [from 14th c.].
  • A specific (specified) period of time. [from 14th c.].
  • An undefined period of time (without qualifier, especially a short period); a while. [from 15th c.].
noun
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Reserved or available accommodation on a public transportation vehicle.
noun
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Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one's needs, interests, and individuality.
noun
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One of the intervals between the lines of a staff.
noun
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One of the intervals during the telegraphic transmission of a message when the key is open or not in contact.
noun
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To stupefy or disorient. Often used with out .

The antihistamine spaces me out so I can't think clearly.

verb
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An interval or period of time, often one of specified length.
noun
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Reserved accommodations.

To buy space on a ship.

noun
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space out
  • To insert more space between letters, words, or lines so as to extend to the required length.
  • To be or seem to be in a daze, distracted, inattentive, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of space

  • Middle English area from Old French espace from Latin spatium
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman space, variant of espace, espas et al., and Old French spaze, variant of espace, from Latin spatium, from Proto-Indo-European (> speed).
    From Wiktionary