Vacuum meaning

văkyo͝om, -yəm, -yo͝o-əm
A state of emptiness; a void.
noun
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A state of being sealed off from external or environmental influences; isolation.
noun
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A vacuum cleaner.
noun
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To vacuum is to clean using a tool that sucks dirt or other elements into a storage container.

An example of vacuum is to clean the dirt off the carpet using a vacuum cleaner.

verb
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Of, relating to, or used to create a vacuum.
adjective
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Containing air or other gas at a reduced pressure.
adjective
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Operating by means of suction or by maintaining a partial vacuum.
adjective
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To clean with or use a vacuum cleaner.
verb
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A space left empty by the removal or absence of something usually found in it; void.
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noun
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Of a vacuum.
adjective
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Used to make a vacuum.
adjective
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Having a vacuum; partially or completely exhausted of air or gas.
adjective
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Working by suction or the creation of a partial vacuum.
adjective
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To clean with a vacuum cleaner.
verb
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A region of space in which there is no matter.
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A region of space having extremely low gas pressure relative to surrounding pressure. The air pump of a vacuum cleaner, for example, drastically reduces the air pressure inside the device, creating a vacuum; the pressure difference causes air to rush into it, carrying dust and debris along with it.
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A space completely void of matter. Although a complete vacuum is unachievable on earth, outer space is theoretically a vacuum to within a few molecules per cubic inch.
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A region of space that contains no matter.
noun
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A vacuum cleaner.
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To clean (something) with a vacuum cleaner.
verb
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(intransitive) To use a vacuum cleaner.
verb
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The definition of a vacuum is a space devoid of air or matter, or a tool that uses suction to clean.

An example of a vacuum is a space with nothing in it.

An example of a vacuum is something used to clean up dirt on a floor.

noun
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A space with nothing at all in it; completely empty space.
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Origin of vacuum

  • Latin empty space from neuter of vacuus empty from vacāre to be empty euə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin vacuum (“an empty space, void"), noun use of neuter of vacuus (“empty"), related to vacare (“be empty")

    From Wiktionary