Tall meaning

tôl
The definition of tall is more than average height or stature, or something that is hard to believe.

An example of someone tall is a woman who measures 6'0".

An example of something tall is a tall tale, an exaggerated tale that is untrue.

adjective
8
1
Tall is defined as in a dignified manner.

An example of tall used as an adverb is in the phrase "walk tall," which means to walk with pride.

adverb
5
1
Fanciful or exaggerated; boastful.

Tall tales of heroic exploits.

adjective
5
1
Impressively great or difficult.

A tall order to fill.

adjective
5
1
With proud bearing; straight.

Stand tall.

adverb
3
2
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Excellent; fine.
adjective
2
3
Of more than normal height or stature.

A tall man, a tall building.

adjective
1
1
Having a specified height.

A plant three feet tall.

adjective
1
3
Large; of considerable size.

A tall drink.

adjective
0
1
High-flown; pompously eloquent.

Tall talk.

adjective
0
1
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In an upright, dignified manner.

To stand tall, ride tall in the saddle.

adverb
0
1
adjective
0
1
(of a person) Having a vertical extent greater than the average. For example, somebody with a height of over 6 feet would generally be considered to be tall.

Being tall is an advantage in basketball.

adjective
0
1
(of a building, etc.) Having its top a long way up; having a great vertical (often greater than horizontal) extent; high.
adjective
0
1
(of a story) Hard to believe, such as a tall story or a tall tale.
adjective
0
1
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(chiefly US, of a cup of coffee) A cup of coffee smaller than grande, usually 8 ounces.
adjective
0
1
Having a specified height.

Five feet tall.

adjective
0
2
Hard to believe because exaggerated or untrue.
adjective
0
2

Origin of tall

  • Middle English brave, quick from Old English getæl swift del-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English tall, talle, tal (“seemly, becoming, excellent, good, valiant, bold, great"), from Old English *tæl, Ä¡etæl (“swift, ready, having mastery of"), from Proto-Germanic *talaz (“submissive, pliable"), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (“to aim, calculate, adjust, reckon"). Cognate with Scots tal (“high, lofty, tall"), Old Frisian tel (“swift"), Old Saxon gital (“quick"), Old High German gizal (“active, agile"), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍄𐌰𐌻𐍃 (untals, “indocile, disobedient").

    From Wiktionary