Derogate meaning

dĕrə-gāt
To take away; detract.

An error that will derogate from your reputation.

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To deviate from a standard or expectation; go astray.

A clause allowing signers of the agreement to derogate from its principles during a state of emergency.

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To disparage; belittle.
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To take (a part or quality) away from something so as to impair it.
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To lower in esteem; disparage.
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To take something desirable away; detract (from)
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To lower oneself; lose face.
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To detract from (something); to disparage, belittle. [from 16th c.]
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(intransitive) To take away (something from something else) in a way which leaves it lessened. [from 16th c.]
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(intransitive) To remove a part, to detract from (a quality of excellence, authority etc.). [from 16th c.]
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(intransitive) To act in a manner below oneself; to debase oneself. [from 17th c.]
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(archaic) Debased.

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Origin of derogate

  • Middle English derogaten from Latin dērogāre dērogāt- dē- de- rogāre to ask reg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From (the participle stem of) Latin dērogāre (“to annul, repeal part of a law, take away, detract from”), from de- (“from”) + rogāre (“to propose a law, ask”). Compare abrogate, interrogate.

    From Wiktionary