Sad definitions

săd
Sad is defined as feeling upset or unhappy about something, often shown physically with a frown.

An example of sad is how a child looks when his parent goes away.

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The definition of sad is bad behavior that should be condemned.

An example of sad is how you would describe the behavior of a man who treats his wife badly.

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Showing, expressing, or feeling sorrow or unhappiness.

A sad face.

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Causing sorrow or gloom; depressing.

A sad movie; sad news.

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Deplorable or inadequate; sorry.

A sad state of affairs; a sad excuse.

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Dark-hued; somber.
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Seasonal affective disorder.
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Having, expressing, or showing low spirits or sorrow; unhappy; mournful; sorrowful.
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Causing or characterized by dejection, melancholy, or sorrow.
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Dark or dull in color; drab.
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Very bad; deplorable.
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Heavy or soggy.

A sad cake.

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Seasonal affective disorder.
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Seasonal affective disorder.
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Francis Bacon.

Ripe and sad courage.

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Ld. Berners.

Which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both parties.

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Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
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She gets sad when he's away.

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Appearing sorrowful.

The puppy had a sad little face.

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Causing sorrow; lamentable.

It's a sad fact that most rapes go unreported.

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Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.

That's the saddest-looking pickup truck I've ever seen.

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(slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.

I can't believe you use drugs; you're so sad!

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(dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
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Mortimer.

Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad.

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(medicine) Seasonal affective disorder.
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(US) Special Activities Division.
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Origin of sad

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (“sated with, weary of, satiated, filled, full"), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (“sated, satisfied"), from Proto-Indo-European *sehâ‚‚- (“to satiate, satisfy"). Cognate with West Frisian sêd, Dutch zat (“sated, drunk"), German satt (“well-fed, full"), Danish sat, Norwegian sad, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌸𐍃 (saþs, “full, satisfied"), and through Indo-European, with Latin satur (“well-fed, sated"). Related to sate.