Palladium meaning

pə-lādē-əm
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A safeguard, especially one viewed as a guarantee of the integrity of social institutions.

The Bill of Rights, palladium of American civil liberties.

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A sacred object that was believed to have the power to preserve a city or state possessing it.
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A soft, ductile, lustrous gray-white, tarnish-resistant, metallic element occurring naturally with platinum, especially in gold, nickel, and copper ores. Because it can absorb large amounts of hydrogen, it is used as a purification filter for hydrogen and a catalyst in hydrogenation. It is alloyed for use in electric contacts, jewelry, nonmagnetic watch parts, and surgical instruments. Atomic number 46; atomic weight 106.4; melting point 1,554.8°C; boiling point 2,963°C; specific gravity 12.02 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4.
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A rare, silver-white, ductile, malleable chemical element, one of the platinum metals: it is used as a catalyst, esp. in hydrogenation processes, or in alloys with gold, silver, and other metals: symbol, Pd; at. no. 46
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In ancient Greece and Rome, any statue of the Greek goddess Pallas Athena; specif., the legendary statue in Troy on the preservation of which the safety of the city was supposed to depend.
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Anything supposed to ensure the safety of something; safeguard.
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A malleable, ductile, grayish-white metallic element that occurs naturally with platinum. It is used as a catalyst in hydrogenation and in alloys for making electrical contacts and jewelry. Atomic number 46; atomic weight 106.4; melting point 1,552°C; boiling point 3,140°C; specific gravity 12.02 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4.
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A silvery metal similar to platinum. Palladium was the original name of Microsoft's security platform (see NGSCB).
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An important industrial metal that has a variety of uses. Automotive catalysts use 63 percent of the demand for palladium; electronic equipment accounts for about 21 percent; dental alloys make up about 12 percent; and the remainder is used for jewelry. Most of the production, around two-thirds, comes from Russia; South Africa makes up just under one-fourth of production; the remainder comes from North America. Palladium futures are traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange; however, the volume is very modest. Other exchanges also trade palladium futures.
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A safeguard (from a statue of Athena that was believed to safeguard the ancient city of Troy).
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Pd) with an atomic number of 46.
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Origin of palladium

  • Middle English Palladion a statue of Pallas Athena believed to protect Troy from Old French palladion from Latin Palladium from Greek Palladion from Pallas Pallad- Pallas Athena

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Pallas (discovered at the same time as the element)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The sense of "safeguard" comes from Latin Palladium (the image of Pallas that protected Troy), from Ancient Greek Παλλάδιον (Palladion), from Παλλάς (Pallas), an alternative name for Athena.

    From Wiktionary

  • The element was named after Pallas, an asteroid that had been discovered two years before the element.

    From Wiktionary