Warp meaning

wôrp
To warp is to distort something.

An example of warp is when wood is exposed to humidity and becomes cupped and bent out of shape.

An example of warp is when you change or distort the truth, causing a different version of the "truth" to be believed.

verb
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To arrange strands of yarn or thread lengthwise onto (a loom) in preparation for weaving.
verb
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To alter from a normal, proper, or healthy state; twist or pervert.
verb
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To turn or twist (wood, for example) out of shape; deform.
verb
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(nautical) To move (a vessel) by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, anchor, or pier.
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To become bent or twisted out of shape.

The wooden frame warped in the humidity.

verb
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To become altered from what is normal, proper, or healthy.
verb
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(nautical) To move a vessel by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, anchor, or pier.
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A distortion or twist, especially in a piece of wood.
noun
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A mental or moral twist, aberration, or deviation.
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The threads that run lengthwise in a woven fabric, crossed at right angles to the woof.
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Warp and woof.
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A mental twist, quirk, aberration, or bias.
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(naut.) A rope run from a ship or boat to a dock, anchor, buoy, etc., used to pull the vessel to a new position.
noun
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To bend or twist out of shape; distort.
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(naut.) To move (a vessel) to a new position by pulling on a rope that has been attached to a dock, anchor, buoy, etc.
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(weaving) To arrange (threads or yarns) so as to form a warp.
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To become bent or twisted out of shape, as wood does in drying.
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To turn aside from the true, natural, or right course.
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(1) See OS/2 Warp.
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(dialectal) A cast of fish (herring, haddock, etc.); four, as a tale of counting fish.
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(dialectal) The young of an animal when brought forth prematurely; a cast lamb, kid. calf, or foal.
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The sediment which subsides from turbid water; the alluvial deposit of muddy water artificially introduced into low lands in order to enrich or fertilise them.
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(uncountable) The state of being bent or twisted out of shape.
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A cast or twist; a distortion or twist, such as in a piece of wood.
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(weaving) The threads that run lengthwise in a woven fabric; crossed by the woof or weft.
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(nautical) A line or cable used in warping a ship.
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A theoretical construct that permits travel across a medium without passing through it normally, such as a teleporter or time warp.
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(dialectal) To bring forth (young) prematurely, said of cattle, sheep, horses, etc.
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(dialectal) To cause a person to suddenly come into a particular state; throw.
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(dialectal) (of the wind or sea) To toss or throw around; carry along by natural force.
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(intransitive, dialectal) (of a do) To throw open; open wide.
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To twist or turn something out of shape.
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To deflect something from a true or proper course.
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(intransitive) To become twisted out of shape.
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(intransitive) To go astray or be deflected from a correct course.
verb
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verb
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To arrange strands of thread etc so that they run lengthwise in weaving.
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(nautical) To move a vessel by hauling on a line or cable that is fastened to an anchor or pier; especially to move a sailing ship through a restricted place such as a harbour.
verb
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(intransitive, nautical) (for a ship) To be moved by warping.
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(intransitive) To fly with a bending or waving motion, like a flock of birds or insects.
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(agriculture) To let the tide or other water in upon (low-lying land), for the purpose of fertilization, by a deposit of warp, or slimy substance.
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(ropemaking) To run off the reel into hauls to be tarred, as yarns.
verb
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The state of being twisted or bent out of shape.
noun
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(nautical) A towline used in warping a vessel.
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Origin of warp

  • Middle English werpen from Old English weorpan to throw away wer-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English werpen, weorpen, worpen, from Old English weorpan (“to throw, cast, cast down, cast away, throw off, throw out, expel, throw upon, throw open, drive away, sprinkle, hit, hand over, lay hands on (a person), cast lots, charge with, accuse of"), from Proto-Germanic *werpanÄ… (“to throw, turn"), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (“to bend, turn"). Cognate with Scots warp (“to throw, warp"), North Frisian werpen (“to throw"), Dutch werpen (“to throw, cast"), German werfen (“to throw, cast"), Icelandic verpa (“to throw").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English warp, werp, from Old English wearp, warp (“a warp, threads stretched lengthwise in a loom, twig, osier"), from Proto-Germanic *warpaz (“a warp"), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (“to turn, bend"). Cognate with Middle Dutch warp, Middle Low German warp, German Warf, Danish varp, Swedish varp.

    From Wiktionary