Loom meaning

lo͝om
To seem imminent; impend.

Revolution loomed but the aristocrats paid no heed.

verb
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A distorted, threatening appearance of something, as through fog or darkness.
noun
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To appear to the mind in a magnified and threatening form.
verb
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To come into view as a massive, distorted, or indistinct image.
verb
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The definition of a loom is a machine used for weaving yarn or thread into fabric.

An example of loom is what a textile maker would use to create fabric.

noun
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An apparatus for making thread or yarn into cloth by weaving strands together at right angles.
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To weave (a tapestry, for example) on a loom.
verb
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A machine for weaving thread or yarn into cloth.
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The art of weaving.
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To weave on a loom.
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To appear, take shape, or come in sight indistinctly as through a mist, esp. in a large, portentous, or threatening form.
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A looming appearance, as of a ship in the fog.
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The part of an oar or paddle between the handle and the blade.
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Loyal Order of Moose.
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A utensil; tool; a weapon; (usually in compound) an article in general.
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A frame or machine of wood or other material, in which a weaver forms cloth out of thread; a machine for interweaving yarn or threads into a fabric, as in knitting or lace making.
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That part of an oar which is near the grip or handle and inboard from the rowlock.
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(dated) Loon (bird of order Gaviformes)
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To impend; to threaten or hang over.

The clouds loomed over the mountains.

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To rise and to be eminent; to be elevated or ennobled, in a moral sense.
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Origin of loom

  • Middle English lome from Old English gelōma tool ge- collective pref. yclept -lōma tool (as in handlōman tools)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lome, from Old English lōma, Ä¡elōma (“tool, utensil, implement, article of furniture, household effect") (also as andlōma, andÄ¡elōma, andlāma (“utensil, instrument, implement, tool, vessel"), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Middle Dutch allame (“tool"). Perhaps originally meaning "a thing of frequent use", in which case, akin to Old English Ä¡elōme (“often, frequently, continually, repeatedly"), from Proto-Germanic *ga- + Proto-Germanic *lōmiz, *lōmijaz (“lame, halt"), from Proto-Indo-European *lem- (“to break, soften"). Compare Old High German giluomo, kilōmo (“often, frequently"), Old English lama (“lame"). See lame.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse ljóma (“to shine")

    From Wiktionary