Ditch definition

dĭch
The definition of a ditch is a long narrow trench or hole dug into the ground.

An example of ditch is digging a moat around a castle.

noun
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1
Ditch is defined as to lose someone or something on purpose.

An example of ditch is leaving unwanted stinky shoes on a bus.

verb
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1
To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
verb
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To derail (a train).
verb
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To get rid of; discard.

Ditched the old yard furniture.

verb
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To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
verb
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To discontinue use of or association with.

Ditch the job at the hamburger stand.

verb
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To dig a ditch.
verb
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To crash-land in water. Used of an aircraft or a pilot.
verb
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To set (a disabled aircraft) down on water and abandon it.
verb
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To cause (a car, wagon, etc.) to go into a ditch.
verb
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To derail (a train)
verb
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To get rid of.
verb
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To get away from (an unwanted companion, etc.)
verb
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Alternative form of deech.
verb
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Alternative form of deech.
noun
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A trench; a long, shallow indentation, as for irrigation or drainage.

Digging ditches has long been considered one of the most demanding forms of manual labor.

noun
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Once the sun came out we ditched our rain-gear and started a campfire.

verb
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(intransitive) To deliberately crash-land an airplane on the sea.

When the second engine failed, the pilot was forced to ditch; their last location was just south of the Azores.

verb
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(intransitive) To deliberately not attend classes; to play hookey.

The truant officer caught Louise ditching with her friends, and her parents were forced to pay a fine.

verb
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(intransitive) To dig ditches.

Enclosure led to fuller winter employment in hedging and ditching.

verb
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To dig ditches around.

The soldiers ditched the tent to prevent flooding.

verb
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To throw into a ditch.

The engine was ditched and turned on its side.

verb
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To surround with a long narrow trench or furrow.
verb
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1
To crash-land (an aircraft) on water.
verb
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To skip (class or school).
verb
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A long, narrow channel dug into the earth, as a trough for drainage or irrigation.
noun
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To border with a ditch.
verb
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To make a ditch or ditches in.
verb
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To dig a ditch or ditches.
verb
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To ditch a disabled plane.
verb
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A long narrow trench or furrow dug in the ground, as for irrigation, drainage, or a boundary line.
noun
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2
To dig or make a long narrow trench or furrow in.
verb
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2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ditch
Plural:
ditches

Origin of ditch

  • Middle English dich from Old English dīc dhīgw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dich, from Old English dīċ ‘trench, moat’, from Proto-Germanic *dīkaz (cf. Swedish dike, Icelandic díki, West Frisian dyk ‘dam’, Dutch dijk ‘id.’, German Teich ‘pond’), from Proto-Indo-European *dheigʷ ‘to stick, set up’ (cf. Latin fīgō ‘to affix, fasten’, Lithuanian diegti ‘to prick; plant’, dýgsti ‘to geminate, grow’). Doublet of dike.

    From Wiktionary

  • From earlier deche, from Middle English dechen, from Old English dēcan (“to smear, plaster, daub”). More at deech.

    From Wiktionary