Trough definition

trôf, trŏf
Frequency:
(meteorology) An elongated region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with a front.
noun
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6
A long, narrow depression, as between waves or ridges.
noun
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3
A long, narrow, open container of wood, stone, etc. for holding water or food for animals.
noun
7
1
A gutter under the edge of a roof for carrying off rainwater.
noun
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5
A narrow, elongated region of relatively low atmospheric pressure occurring at the ground surface or in the upper atmosphere, and often associated with a front.
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A low in any cycle, esp. in an economic cycle.
noun
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1
A long, narrow area of low barometric pressure.
noun
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1
A low point in a business cycle or on a statistical graph.
noun
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5
Any similarly shaped vessel, as one for kneading or washing something.
noun
2
1
A long, narrow hollow or depression, as between waves.
noun
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1
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The part of a wave with the least magnitude; the lowest part of a wave.
2
1
Any of various similar containers for domestic or industrial use, such as kneading or washing.
noun
1
0
A channel for conveying fluids; esp., a gutter.
noun
1
1
The definition of a trough is a long and narrow container.

An example of a trough is what pigs eat out of.

An example of a trough is a long container in which plants grow next to each other.

noun
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(physics) A minimum point in a wave or an alternating signal.
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A long, narrow, generally shallow receptacle for holding water or feed for animals.
noun
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The period when a bear market is ending and prices begin to rise. On a price chart, a trough looks like the bottom half of the letter “o.”
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A long, narrow container, open on top, for feeding or watering animals.

One of Hank's chores was to slop the pigs' trough each morning and evening.

noun
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Any similarly shaped container.
  • (Australia, New Zealand) A rectangular container used for washing or rinsing clothes.
    Ernest threw his paint brushes into a kind of trough he had fashioned from sheet metal that he kept in the sink.
noun
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A short, narrow canal designed to hold water until it drains or evaporates.

There was a small trough that the sump pump emptied into; it was filled with mosquito larvae.

noun
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(Canada) A gutter under the eaves of a building; an eaves trough.

The troughs were filled with leaves and needed clearing.

noun
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(agriculture, Australia, New Zealand) A channel for conveying water or other farm liquids (such as milk) from place to place by gravity; any "˜U' or "˜V' cross-sectioned irrigation channel.
noun
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A long, narrow depression between waves or ridges; the low portion of a wave cycle.

The buoy bobbed between the crests and troughs of the waves moving across the bay.

The neurologist pointed to a troubling trough in the pattern of his brain-waves.

noun
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(meteorology) A linear atmospheric depression associated with a weather front.
noun
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To eat in a vulgar style, as if eating from a trough.

He troughed his way through 3 meat pies.

verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
trough
Plural:
troughs

Origin of trough

  • Middle English from Old English trog deru- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English trog, from Proto-Germanic *trugÄ…, *trugaz (compare West Frisian trôch, Dutch trog, Swedish trÃ¥g), from Proto-Indo-European *dru-kó (compare Middle Irish drochta (“wooden basin"), Old Armenian Õ¿Õ¡Ö€Õ£Õ¡Õ¬ (targal, “ladle, spoon"), enlargement of *dóru (“tree")). More at tree.

    From Wiktionary