Shovel meaning

shŭvəl
A hand tool with a handle, used for moving portions of material such as earth, snow, and grain from one place to another, with some forms also used for digging. Not to be confused with a spade, which is designed solely for small-scale digging and incidental tasks such as chopping of small roots.
noun
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The definition of a shovel is a tool that has a long handle and a broad pan used to lift and move things.

An example of a shovel is a tool with which to dig dirt.

noun
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Shovel is defined as to lift and move with a shovel.

An example of shovel is to dig in the sand.

verb
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A large mechanical device or vehicle for heavy digging or excavation.
noun
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To move or remove with a shovel.
verb
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A tool with a handle and a broad scoop or blade for digging and moving material, such as dirt or snow.
noun
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To dig or work with a shovel.
verb
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noun
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To lift and move with a shovel.
verb
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To clean or dig out (a path, etc.) with a shovel.
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To put or throw, in large quantities.

To shovel food into one's mouth.

verb
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To use a shovel.
verb
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(US) A spade.
noun
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To move materials with a shovel.

The workers were shovelling gravel and tarmac into the pothole in the road.

After the blizzard, we shoveled the driveway for the next two days.

I don't mind shoveling, but using a pickaxe hurts my back terribly.

verb
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(figuratively) To move with a shoveling motion.
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The amount that a shovel can hold; a shovelful.

One shovel of dirt.

noun
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To make with a shovel.

Shoveled a path through the snow.

verb
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To convey or throw in a rough or hasty way, as if with a shovel.

He shoveled the food into his mouth.

verb
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To clear or excavate with or as if with a shovel.

Shoveling off the driveway after the snowstorm; shovels out the hall closet once a year.

verb
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Origin of shovel

  • Middle English from Old English scofl

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English shovele, schovel, showell, shoule, shole (> English dialectal shoul, shool), from Old English scofl (“shovel"), from Proto-Germanic *skuflō, *skÅ«flō (“shovel"), equivalent to shove +"Ž -el (instrumental/agent suffix). Cognate with Scots shuffle, shule, shuil (“shovel"), Saterland Frisian Sköifel (“shovel"), West Frisian skoffel, schoffel (“hoe, spade, shovel"), Dutch schoffel (“spade, hoe"), Low German Schüfel, Schuffel (“shovel"), German Schaufel (“shovel"), Danish skovl (“shovel"), Swedish skyffel, skovel (“shovel"), Icelandic skófla (“shovel").

    From Wiktionary