Digger meaning

dĭgər
Frequency:
A person or thing that digs; specif., any tool or machine for digging.
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An Australian or New Zealander, esp. one who is a soldier.
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Used as a disparaging term, especially in the 1800s, for a member of any of various Native American peoples of the Great Basin, such as the Utes, Paiutes, and Western Shoshones.
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A member of any of several North American Indian peoples of the SW U.S. that dug roots for food.
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A large piece of machinery that digs holes or trenches; an excavator.
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A tool for digging.
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A spade (playing card).
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One who digs.
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(Australia, dated) An informal nickname for a friend; used as a term of endearment.
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(Australia) An Australian or New Zealand soldier.
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A soldier from Australia or New Zealand.
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(historical) One of a group of Protestant English agrarian communists, begun by Gerrard Winstanley as "True Levellers" in 1649.
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Origin of digger

  • Sense 3, from their use of digging sticks as foraging tools

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Derived from Australian Colonial goldfields terminology. The term represents the mateship of common interests and activities where most of the population were gold miners, and almost everybody was a mate, a "digger", with a common cause against the troopers, the traps, the mining licence inspectors.

    From Wiktionary

  • (Australian soldier): Attributed to the considerable time that soldiers spent digging trenches during World War I.

    From Wiktionary