Grok meaning

grŏk
Frequency:
To understand profoundly through intuition or empathy.
verb
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To have a thorough understanding of a subject. The word comes from Robert Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land," and it means "to drink" in Martian. Of course. But more specifically in the book, it meant to take something in so thoroughly that it becomes part of you.
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(slang) To have or to have acquired an intuitive understanding of; to know (something) without having to think (such as knowing the number of objects in a collection without needing to count them: see subitize).
verb
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(slang) To fully and completely understand something in all its details and intricacies.

He groks Perl.

I find it exceedingly doubtful that any person groks quantum mechanics.

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Origin of grok

  • Coined by Robert A. Heinlein in his Stranger in a Strange Land

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Coined by Robert A. Heinlein in his novel Stranger in a Strange Land (1961) in which the word is described as being from the word for “to drink" and, figuratively, “to drink in all available aspects of reality", “to become one with the observed" in Heinlein's fictitious Martian language.

    From Wiktionary