Captive meaning

kăptĭv
Frequency:
Restrained by circumstances that prevent free choice.

A captive audience; a captive market.

adjective
6
0
One held in the grip of a strong emotion or passion.
noun
4
0
A person caught and held prisoner, as in war.
noun
4
1
Taken and held prisoner, as in war.
adjective
3
0
A subsidiary that serves only its parent company.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
Held in bondage; enslaved.
adjective
2
0
Enraptured, as by beauty; captivated.
adjective
2
0
Serving a single company exclusively.

A captive insurer.

adjective
2
0
A person who is captivated, as by beauty or love.
noun
1
0
Captivated.
adjective
1
1
Advertisement
Of captivity.
adjective
0
0
One who has been captured or is otherwise confined.
noun
0
0
One held prisoner.
noun
0
0
(figuratively) One charmed or subdued by beauty, excellence, or affection; one who is captivated.
noun
0
0
Held prisoner; not free; confined.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Subdued by love; charmed; captivated.
adjective
0
0
Of or relating to bondage or confinement; serving to confine.

Captive chains; captive hours.

adjective
0
0
A captive is defined as a person or animal who has been confined or held hostage.

An animal locked in a cage is an example of a captive.

A person who has been held hostage is an example of a captive.

noun
0
1
One, such as a prisoner of war, who is forcibly confined, subjugated, or enslaved.
noun
0
1
Kept under restraint or control; confined.

Captive birds.

adjective
0
1
Advertisement
The definition of captive is someone who is confined, controlled or has no alternatives.

An audience that cannot get up and leave even if they want to is an example of a captive audience.

adjective
0
2

Origin of captive

  • Middle English captif from Old French from Latin captīvus from captus past participle of capere to seize kap- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Ultimately from Latin captivus.

    From Wiktionary